NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for Ducks
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
15572
Abstract:
Jim Christopher, president and CEO of Concord Farms, Inc., is on a mission to convince Americans to eat more duck. In 1987, the farm plans to process eight million ducks, a doubling of the number processed in 1985. The company can process up to 24,000 a day. The finished product is then sold in all fifty states and abroad. Duck feathers sold for jackets, comforters, and pillows account for 10 to 20 percent of company revenues, which were estimated at over $41 million in 1986.
Record #:
24751
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2010, Andrew Frank, his wife, and his son began working on their now successful Duck Dance Farm in Burnsville. The farm breeds duck, geese, and fish, but does not sell the meat from these animals. Instead, they make a profit from the eggs the duck and geese lay. The family defines their farming philosophy as responsible and raises the birds as free range.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
6591
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA series about wildlife species in the state, Amundson describes puddle ducks, so named because \"they habitually feed in shallow water by dabbling and tipping up their tails with their heads submerged so that only the posterior shows above the water.\" A large number either visit or reside in North Carolina, including the shoveler, gadwall, and baldpate. Amundson discusses the puddle duck's history, characteristics, range and distribution, breeding and food habits, and management.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6590
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA series about wildlife species in the state, Amundson describes diving ducks, so named because of their particular feeding habit. There are eleven diving ducks that visit the state each year. Amundson discusses the characteristics, breeding and food habits, migration, natural enemies, and management of this wildlife species.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9195
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the first of a two-part series, Hawkins discusses the plight of the canvasback and redhead ducks.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9197
Author(s):
Abstract:
In part 1 of this series, Hawkins discussed the great popularity of these ducks, both as sporting and table birds, since the early days of the nation. In part 2, she discusses their precarious nesting grounds.
Full Text:
Record #:
891
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mixed in with all the ducks and geese that normally visit NC each year are some exotic species seldom seen along the mid-Atlantic coast.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
36166
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shelter often entails providing for the basic needs of life, and shoreline creatures are no exception. Among life calling lakes and ponds at and below the surface home were the duck potato and duckweek, the great blue heron and leopard frog.
Record #:
37810
Author(s):
Abstract:
When a man came across a pond full of ducks, he laid on the ground watching them so they didn’t startle, and then when he began to more and yell, he found that the ducks became curious and still stayed in the pond.
Subject(s):
Record #:
37820
Author(s):
Abstract:
A few tidbits about snake folklore, ducks, a fishing story, and a tool used for removing fishing hooks.
Record #:
38226
Author(s):
Abstract:
In order to classify the duck or goose that has been caught; a simplistic key has been provided.
Subject(s):