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43 results for Tributaries
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Record #:
17804
Abstract:
New details about Captain Michael Quinn are revealed by combining archaeological and historical. He was a captain in the North Carolina Continental Line, a Revolutionary War group of troops. Later during his army career he turned from the Continental army to become a loyalist. After turning his loyalty, Quinn and his ship were captured outside of Edenton and killed during an attempted escape.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 15, October 2008, p13-26, il
Record #:
17805
Author(s):
Abstract:
Public health policy was managed at a local level throughout much of the state's history. Wilmington serves as a case study because of public health policy development for several reasons. The city's need for a health program for its citizens was compounded because of its continually growing population throughout much of history and its role as a bustling port. A history of public health concerns and local officials reactions are reviewed in this article.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 15, October 2008, p27-39, il
Record #:
17803
Abstract:
The Citte of Raleigh became the first colony in America founded by the English in 1585. John White returned to the colony to find its settlers had vanished. Though mystery surrounds the lost settlers, modern historians and archaeologists are seeking physical remains of the colony. The author used a comparative cartographic approach to demonstrate site formation processes along the island and propose the Citte of Raleigh remains are now submerged.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 15, October 2008, p6-12, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17801
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2006, the Sunny Side Oyster Bar marked its 77th anniversary. The little Williamston eatery represents a disappearing cultural landmark popular from the 1930s to the 1950s. Sunny Side Oyster Bar and its now defunct brethren are documented in this article.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 14, October 2006, p12-22, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17802
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state continued its shore whaling activities into the early 20th-century. Being situated near the Gulf Stream, whalers caught whales first near Albemarle and later Cape Lookout, Shackleford Banks and Bogue Banks. The author discusses local whaling traditions and the history of the industry throughout eastern North Carolina.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 14, October 2006, p23-32, il
Record #:
17783
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilmington thrived as a Civil War blockade running port because of its proximity to foreign ports, Bermuda and Nassau, and internal connections via railroad to Charleston and Richmond. Typically blockade runners brought in much needed supplies and were celebrated, however, the steamship Kate also brought along yellow fever in the late summer of 1862. Historic sources vary on total number of deaths but modern scholars believe it to be between 446 to 700 or more.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 13, October 2005, p16-28, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17784
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deadrise skiffs are a local, vernacular craft made specifically in the area of Core and Bogue Sounds. The shallow centerboard vessels are still built in the same way, using the same materials because the design is so well-suited for the environment. Initially used as work boats and for fishing, modern watermen typically use the boats for recreational purposes.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 13, October 2005, p29-33, il
Record #:
17780
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Vidal's career as a pirate was short-lived and comedic. For one week in 1727, Vidal, who called Bath home, attempted to raid Ocracoke Inlet just after the Gold Age of Piracy. His acts of piracy around the inlet were brought to trial on August 15, 1727 in front of Virginia's Acting Royal Governor. Where Vidal was unfortunate in piracy, he was fortunate in the Governor's ruling which initially was execution but Vidal was later pardoned.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 12, October 2004, p6-17, il
Record #:
17782
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Ocracoke was built to protect the inlet which connected the Pamlico Sound with the Atlantic. Designed by Colonel Ellwood Morris, construction started on May 1861. Five companies supported the 20 gun fort until an attack on Fort Hatteras drew four of these five companies away. Orders soon followed that if Fort Hatteras fell Fort Ocracoke should be abandoned, which it was with Confederate troops spiking its guns and burning the fort.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 12, October 2004, p26-31, il
Record #:
17781
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Confederate Torpedo Bureau was an initiative by Confederate leaders to find alternatives to protect the South's coastline and harbors from a much larger Union Navy. Wilmington was the state's torpedo building center. Another Confederate Torpedo Bureau initiative in the state includes the cooperative efforts between Captain Rains and Colonel William Lamb in constructing and designing defenses for Fort Fisher.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 12, October 2004, p18-25, il
Record #:
17747
Author(s):
Abstract:
The entire issue is dedicated to the Queen Anne's Revenge shipwreck with historical background about pirates, Blackbeard's escapades throughout North Carolina, and updates from the field excavations.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 11, October 2001, p1-64, il
Record #:
17745
Author(s):
Abstract:
Distilling alcohol for private consumption has been regulated in the state since 1715. Complete prohibition occurred in 1908 after the passing of Watts and Ward Law. One reason distillation remained so prevalent in the northeast portion of the state is that distilling used the similar equipment as for making turpentine, an already established industry in the area. Dare County moonshiners took to distilling both because they already had the equipment and also tough economic times drove them to lucrative manufacturing and sale of alcohol.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 9, October 1999, p7-23, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17746
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author delivers a person narrative of growing up in the sports fishermen world on the Outer Banks with historical background included.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 9, October 1999, p25-39, il
Record #:
3917
Author(s):
Abstract:
By studying the historical geography of Beaufort Inlet, Intersal, Inc. was able to determine inlet boundaries, features, and obstacles in the 18th-century. Using this data, the firm conducted a ten-year search that discovered what is thought to be the wreck of Blackbeard's flagship QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 8, Oct 1998, p24-33, il
Record #:
17744
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the War of 1812, Otway Burns successfully raided British ship in American waters. Burns commanded the Snap Dragon and often sailing from Beaufort and Swansboro with a crew of as many as 75 men. The author challenges the generally accepted figures for Burns' war time prizes and questions the credibility of sources previously used.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 8, Oct 1998, p7-17, il