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16 results for North Carolina--History--War of 1812
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Record #:
8077
Abstract:
During the War of 1812, 1,607 British vessels were captured. Of this number, ninety-six were brought to nine North Carolina ports. Wilmington had the most with thirty-six, followed by Portsmouth and Beaufort. Otway Burns, captain of the SNAP DRAGON, brought in forty-two vessels and over 300 English prisoners. These ships and their cargoes were valued at more than $4 million. Blades lists each captured ship, who captured it, and the North Carolina port where it was taken.
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Record #:
8978
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Abstract:
The SNAP DRAGON was a two-topsail schooner used by privateer Otway Burns during the War of 1812. Captured in 1814, there is no American information as to what happened to the ship after its capture. British records show it was bought at auction and sailed to Jamaica in 1815. The final entry says she left Jamaica in 1816, and the trail of the schooner ends there.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 6, Nov 1980, p12-14, il
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Record #:
10953
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Although he was born in Ireland, Johnson Blakely is considered by many to be North Carolina's greatest hero of the sea. Blakely distinguished himself at the University of North Carolina by threatening to throw President Caldwell out the window. In 1799, he joined the American navy, and served twelve years before taking command of his own ship. During the War of 1812, he had many battles with and captures of British ships. His ship was last seen on October 19, 1814, then captain and crew vanished forever.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 21, Apr 1968, p13, por
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Record #:
17744
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During the War of 1812, Otway Burns successfully raided British ship in American waters. Burns commanded the Snap Dragon and often sailing from Beaufort and Swansboro with a crew of as many as 75 men. The author challenges the generally accepted figures for Burns' war time prizes and questions the credibility of sources previously used.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 8, Oct 1998, p7-17, il
Record #:
18374
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite the 1783 treaty that ended the American Revolution, conflict between the U.S. and Great Britain remained. In 1812, America took a stand against Great Britain and declared war. During the War of 1812, North Carolinians played a large part in each stage of the war from the decision to declare war to the Treaty at Ghent.
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Record #:
18375
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Forsythe County, North Carolina is named for Benjamin Forsythe, the heroic leader of the Rifle Regiment during the War of 1812.
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Record #:
18377
Abstract:
In 1809, the U.S. Navy launched Gunboat 166 near Wilmington, North Carolina. It was the first of three small warships built in North Carolina before the War of 1812. Gunboat 166 was later converted from a sloop to a schooner sailing rig and renamed ALLIGATOR. It was activated for patrol duty in the Cape Fear River and protected American merchant ships from British warships along the North Carolina coast.
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Record #:
18376
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The battle between the two ships lasted barely twenty minutes. But when the smoke cleared, Johnston Blakeley emerged as an American hero. Considered North Carolina's greatest naval hero of the War of 1812, Blakeley and his crew commanded the USS WASP during their defeat of Great Britain's HMS Reindeer.
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Record #:
19423
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It isn't a generally known fact, but on two separate occasions, North Carolina officially acted as guardian for two young children and provided for their education and upkeep. Both were aided because of incidents that occurred during the War of 1812. Udney Maria Blakely was the daughter of Captain Johnston Blakely, the gallant captain of the warship Wasp, which vanished at sea and was never found. The other ward was James Forsyth, the only son of Benjamin Forsyth, a hero from Stokes County who was killed during the fighting in Canada.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 42, Mar 1944, p1, 14
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Record #:
19643
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Abstract:
Captain Johnston Blakeley, commander of the sloop of war WASP, was lost at sea with all crew aboard. He left behind a wife, Jane Anne Blakeley (nee Hoope), and infant daughter Udney Maria Blakeley. On December 28, 1816 the North Carolina Legislature unanimously adopted a resolution that Udney Blakeley be educated at the expense of the state and that Mrs. Blakeley receive money as needed from the treasurer of the state for her education, making Udney Blakeley the first ward of the state of North Carolina.
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Record #:
21239
Abstract:
During the War of 1812, the majority of North Carolina citizens supported military action against Great Britain. There was though, a noticeable amount of hesitation and dissent for war on the part of the common man, North Carolina state leaders and national representatives.
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Record #:
24530
Abstract:
North Carolina’s first steamboat, PROMETHEUS (ship), was built in Swansboro by Captain Otway Burns (1775-1850), a Privateer hero of the War of 1812.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 6, November 1977, p8-10, il
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Record #:
16065
Abstract:
During the War of 1812, Captain Otway Burns became a notorious privateer. He purchased the vessel Snap Dragon in New York and proceeded to captured approximately $2,500,000 worth of prizes, including value of ships and their cargos. Following the war, the experienced captain continued as a merchant until his death in 1848.
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Record #:
9757
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Otway Burns was born near Swansboro in 1775, and began his sailing career as a young man. He was North Carolina�s and the South's most famous and successful privateer of the War of 1812. Sailing aboard the SNAP DRAGON, he captured almost 40 ships with cargoes totaling millions of dollars. His ship was frequently outgunned, however, Burns' outstanding seamanship was more than a match for a superior foe. Although Otway Burns died an obscure pauper, he holds today an honored place in the state's maritime history.
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