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15 results for The Researcher Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006
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Record #:
7912
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Abstract:
Many people have heard of Fairleigh Dickinson University, and the third-largest medical products and equipment industry in the world, Becton-Dickinson. Fewer people know that Fairleigh Dickinson was born in Carteret County in the Core Creek community. He left home at fourteen to take a job on a sailing ship. Later a chance meeting with Maxwell Becton of Kinston led to the founding of Becton-Dickinson, which reported revenues of almost $5 million in 2004. Although he led a very busy life filled with national and international commitments, Dickinson and his family returned to Core Creek every year till his death in 1948.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p16-18, il, por, bibl
Record #:
7913
Author(s):
Abstract:
A severe hurricane struck Carteret County with wind gusts in excess of 150 miles per hour on August 18, 1879. William B. Duncan wrote several letters to his son Thomas Isaac Duncan about the effects of the storm. The letters provide an eyewitness account of the storm's damage.
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Record #:
34742
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In 1914, Orion Knitting Mills moved their operations from Kinston to Beaufort, North Carolina. To entice the company into moving, Beaufort citizens purchased a lot and erected a building for company use. Local businessmen further influenced the town to exempt the mill for taxes and electrical payments for the first five years of operation. In July, 1914 the company agreed and erected a factory and worker housing on ‘Knit Mill Hill’ near Shell Road, Beaufort. Local women were employed as workers in the mill; they operated machines which manufactured hosiery and knit goods. The Orion Knitting Mill closed in 1931, and was replaced by a tomato packing plant. In 1934, it again transitioned into Saunders Dry Cleaners.
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Record #:
34743
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The breakwater at Cape Lookout was first constructed in 1915 as a means of improving harbor safety. Constructed from North Carolina quarried granite, the stone was brought by train from Raleigh to Morehead City. From there, it was transported eleven miles to the dumping point on scows and derric boats in 1,000 ton loads. The breakwater measured approximately 100 feet in length and cost 3.5 million dollars to build. Construction took 18 months and involved over 30 vessels carrying materials to site.
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Record #:
34745
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First organized in 1790, Hadnot Creek Primitive Baptist Church is Carteret County’s oldest church society in continuous service. The building, located on Highway 58, was erected in 1815 for the congregation. Constructed from pine and other local tree species, many elements of initial construction can be seen in the Church’s interior. Today, services are only held twice a year to commemorate the first congregation. There is an ongoing effort in the community to restore the grounds and Church to their 1815 condition.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p10-11, il
Record #:
34744
Author(s):
Abstract:
In February 1862, two Beaufort residents successfully ran the Union blockade of Beaufort on board the CSS NASHVILLE. Used for transporting goods, NASHVILLE would continue to serve as a blockade runner for Confederate forces. In March, NASHVILLE transported arms and munitions across the blockade at the Cape Fear River; sailed into Nassau, and successfully bypassed Union sailors at the port of Georgetown, South Carolina.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p5-6, il
Record #:
34747
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Abstract:
This episode is the final installment of the diary of Daniel Reid, a local Methodist minister working in Carteret County in 1896. The final entries in his diary indicate he continued to visit members of the congregation despite battling illness. Reid passed away on 17 June, 1896 from meningitis. He was remembered as caring and charitable by the congregation. Following his death, the congregation moved to Stella, North Carolina and joined the Silverdale community.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p19-25, il, por
Record #:
34746
Author(s):
Abstract:
Portsmouth Island was home to sailing captains, fishermen, lighters, hunters, and wrackers in the historic era. This community was dependent on the ocean and island resources. While the residents have long vanished, their stories remain preserved in a number of buildings on the island. The Methodist church and personal cemeteries bear witness to the past lives which created the small community.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p11-15, il
Record #:
35019
Author(s):
Abstract:
Efforts to boost the local economy encouraged leaders to establish businesses such as Orion Knitting Mills. This business, open from 1914 until 1984, was well known not just for providing jobs for women in the area as it was its original location. Because of the high elevation point, the business later purchased by J.H. Johnson Jr. and Harry Saunders and re-born as Johnson-Saunders Dry Cleaners became known to denizens as “Knit Mill Hill.”
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Subject(s):
Record #:
35017
Author(s):
Abstract:
Efforts to boost the local economy encouraged leaders to establish businesses such as Orion Knitting Mills. This business, open from 1914 until 1984, was well known not just for providing jobs for women in the area as it was its original location. Because of the high elevation point, the business later purchased by J.H. Johnson Jr. and Harry Saunders and re-born as Johnson-Saunders Dry Cleaners became known to denizens as “Knit Mill Hill.”
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Subject(s):
Record #:
35022
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted first about Fairleigh Stanton Dickinson is the fact that he has a university named in his honor, Fairleigh Dickinson University (FDU). What follows helps to justify such an honor. Emphasized were a partnership with Maxwell W. Becton of a company that was the third largest producer of medical products in the world; military service that yielded membership in the War Department’s business council; ownership of The Pilgrim, which served as a patrol craft during WWII; civic contributions including director of the American Surgical Trade Association; and a donation of $100,000 plus for the construction of a new non-denominational community church and parish hall.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p16-18
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Record #:
35021
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hadnot Primitive Baptist Church, located on Highway 58 in Carteret County, is valuable from a county level, as well as a personal level for many natives of the area. The building, believed to have been erected in 1815, has been a welcoming and unique worship space for members and visitors alike. Among the appealing features associated with Hadnot are the cemetery, unique worship services, and balcony. Such valuable aspects help to offset the challenges this church has faced, such as increasing land values and unanticipated recent area development
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p10-11
Subject(s):
Record #:
35020
Author(s):
Abstract:
The third in a series of relatively unknown oceanic escapades that took place during the early Civil War focused on the maritime blockades by Beaufort natives Captain John Beveridge and Josiah Pender, as well as Harker’s Island natives Matthew Goodring and Lieutenant Whittle. While in command of the CSS Nashville, Beveridge and Pender successfully executed four blockades in 1862. That same year, Goodring and Whittle had one successful blockade.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
35023
Author(s):
Abstract:
Included in this section are daily entries between May 1-26, 1896 that reflect on topics such as the weather, visits from family and friends; and a brief memoir, the religious background of himself and his parents, which yielded his pastoring several churches in towns such as Sampson and Vanceboro between 1887 and his death in 1896.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p19-25
Subject(s):
Record #:
35400
Author(s):
Abstract:
The third in a series of relatively unknown oceanic escapades that took place during the early Civil War focused on the maritime blockades by Beaufort natives Captain John Beveridge and Josiah Pender, as well as Harker’s Island natives Matthew Goodring and Lieutenant Whittle. While in command of the CSS Nashville, Beveridge and Pender successfully executed four blockades in 1862. That same year, Goodring and Whittle had one successful blockade.
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