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211 results for "The Researcher"
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Record #:
34587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brinson recalls a memory from his early teenage years when he and a playmate used Brinson’s dinghy to stow aboard GLORIA M, a local trawler tied up at the fish house. While standing to board the trawler, the dinghy capsized and deposited both boys in the water.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 11 Issue 4, Fall 1995, p5-6
Record #:
34764
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following the United States entrance into World War II in 1942, the battle for the north Atlantic was going poorly. Over 600 ships and six million tons of shipping were destroyed by German U-boats. These engagements became known as a wild turkey shoot. Vessels offshore from Morehead City and Beaufort were seen damaged and sinking on a daily basis; they were often attacked by German forces during the night. The Morehead City hospital was expanded to increase services to burned and injured sailors.
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Record #:
34654
Author(s):
Abstract:
Various autograph books are housed in the Carteret County Historical Society. The earliest, dating to the 1860s, contains inscriptions from friends and family. Autograph books were a popular pastime for young people and often express their sentiments towards peers.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p18, il
Record #:
34515
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a reprint of an 1810 letter describing Beaufort written by Jacob Henry, a Jewish County representative in the State General Assembly. Henry discusses the town’s shipbuilding, whaling, and fishing industries, as well as points of interest for tourists.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p8-9
Record #:
34731
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author shares memories of growing up in Beaufort between 1921 and 1931. Born into a family with three siblings, the author recalls various establishments including the Courthouse, Methodist Church, family doctor, and railroad. The menhaden fisheries, too, left a lasting impression for the smell that would waft through town as fish were being processed.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p19-21, il, por
Record #:
34768
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following the surrender of General Cornwallis at Yorktown, Virginia, skirmishes between rebels and loyalists continued. In April 1782, three loyalist vessels anchored in Beaufort harbor to conduct a raid against colonists. A small group of Continental Army members joined forces, guarding granaries and warehouses in Harkers Island and Beaufort. While the British and loyalists were able to take control of the town fort, they did not capture the stores at Harkers Island.
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Record #:
34749
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort’s first African-American school, the Washburn seminary, was founded in 1867 by the American Missionary Association and the northern Congregation Church. Located in a traditionally black neighborhood, the school’s aim was to train and educate freed slaves living in a refugee camp in Beaufort. Teachers were brought from northern states as educators, and by 1900 the school had expanded to include several new buildings including a training workshop and classrooms. In 1920, the main school building burned and was rebuilt near the new Beaufort High School which catered to the black community. Today, this building remains in use as the Beaufort Central School.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p5-6
Record #:
34766
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town of Beaufort, nestled on the Outer Banks, is the origins of the Inland waterway. This maritime route extends into the Neuse River, where it joins the Pamlico Sound. Traveling north, mariners can follow the Pamlico into the Albemarle and Chesapeake Bays. To move between Beaufort and Norfolk, Virginia, a system of canals linking the rivers and sounds was created. In 1925, canal expansion was underway to link the Alligator River and Cape Fear River into this inland waterway, bypassing the Pamlico Sound and the capes of the Outer Banks, respectively.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Fall-Spring 2008/2009, p3-5, il, map
Record #:
34757
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1940, the Burleigh family move to Morehead City from England as they feared German invasion. Mr. Burleigh had stayed to serve England, however his wife and children became integrated into the local Carteret County community. Their host family would later receive the King’s Medal for Service in the Cause of Freedom—one of 16 North Carolina families bestowed this honor.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2008, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
34477
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article describes vernacular oyster dredge manufacture by Mr. Closs Harvey on the Outer Banks in the 1930s. Dredges were made of steel rods joined with a hand-cranked forge. Images of the dredges are included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Summer 1992, p10, il, por
Record #:
34655
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drawing on primary accounts, this article addresses the cruise of the Confederate blockade runner CSS NASHVILLE between October 1861 and February 1862. Beginning in Bermuda, NASHVILLE sailed for Beaufort, NC and encountered Union ships outside the harbor. Using a false flag, NASHVILLE passed by the enemy vessel. The Union sailors soon discovered the ruse and began firing at the blockade runner. NASHVILLE successfully evaded the shots and sought cover at Fort Macon, proceeding to Morehead City. Various other vessels saw the encounter and commented on the skill of the crew. NASHVILLE was eventually sold for private use.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p19-23, il
Record #:
34505
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carteret County Historical Society is located on the former grounds of Camp Glenn, North Carolina’s first permanent State Guard location. Built in 1906, the Camp remained in use through 1936, when the National Guard moved to a larger property. During the First World War, the camp functioned as a naval radio station and base.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Winter 1994, p9-10, il, por
Record #:
34789
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the 1950s, the author worked as a summer camp counselor at Camp Morehead. Primarily a boys’ camp, three weeks were set aside each summer for co-ed habitation. The author herself had attended camp during one such session where she learned to sail. Returning in college as a counselor, the author was placed in charge of sailing instruction and office duty which included running errands. Throughout the summer, campers were brought into Morehead City to visit various stores and enjoy some of the local cuisine.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p5-7, il, por
Record #:
34506
Author(s):
Abstract:
An excerpt from a travel diary, this article details a visit to the Cape Lookout Lighthouse in 1953. Emphasis is placed on daily activities at the lighthouse, Coast Guard activity, and lighthouse activities during a hurricane.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Winter 1994, p11-13
Record #:
34752
Author(s):
Abstract:
Written in 1921, this article describes Cape Lookout at the “lonesomest” place in the world. Prior to the First World War, Cape Lookout was a bustling harbor undergoing improvements. With the war effort, however, construction of a breakwater stopped and many residents returned to Harker’s Island on the Core sound. Returning to the community, the author notes that many of the fishermen have abandoned the Cape Lookout fish stock because of its poor value. As one of the most dangerous shoals, the Cape Lookout Coast Guard station is outfitted with radio service. The guardsmen had rescued 30 vessels between 1911 and 1921.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p9-10, il