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9 results for North Carolina--History--World War, 1939-1945--Naval operations--Submarines
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Record #:
4436
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Abstract:
In the early days of World War II, residents of the Outer Banks' communities, including Harkers Island and villagers on Hatteras and Ocracoke islands, saw the war up close and personal, as German submarines sank Allied ships within sight of the mainland. Cheatham recounts incidents from the dark days of 1942, when German U-Boats ruled the seas off North Carolina.
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Record #:
5205
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Weeksville, in Pasquotank County, was a major U.S. Naval Air Station during World War II and a major player in the battle against German submarines. Here were based lighter-than-air aircraft that patrolled the Atlantic, hunting German U-Boats. The base housed 850 officers and men and had two large hangers, one steel, the other wooden. The wooden hanger was the largest wooden structure in the world; it burned in August 1995.
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Record #:
11269
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North Carolina native Vernon L. Lowrance is the new commander of Submarine Force Atlantic (Vice Admiral). Lowrance served in World War II as a submarine commander of the USS R-16 Kingfish, and others. These commands require skill in the field of silence, as submarines patrol neutral waters to obtain information on foreign powers. For his services, Lowrance was awarded the Navy Cross, Silver, and Gold stars before receiving his current command. He is a veteran of thirty-four years of naval service.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 5, Aug 1965, p7, por
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Record #:
21300
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Abstract:
During the first few months of World War II, German submarines sank over sixty ships off North Carolina's Outer Banks. Cheatham recounts experiences of North Carolinians living on the Outer Banks, the sinkings, and the incident involving the British vessel, Bedfordshire.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 5 Issue 2, Nov 1999, p1-5, il, por, map, f
Record #:
16153
Author(s):
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Torpedo junction referred to the state's Atlantic coastline. Before Germany declared war on the United States, Germany's U-boats were successfully sinking commercial vessels for a six month period before the country could retaliate. From December 1941 to April 1942, U-boats operated with tragic precision, torpedoed an estimated 87 ships off the state's coast.
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Record #:
10518
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Abstract:
Weeksville, near Elizabeth City in Pasquotank County, was a major U.S. Naval Air Station during World War II and a major player in the battle against German submarines. Here were based lighter-than-air aircraft that patrolled the Atlantic, hunting German U-Boats.
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Record #:
34480
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Abstract:
Drawing on a recent presentation by Paul Branch at Fort Macon, the author presents an overview of German sub warfare off North Carolina during the Second World War. Details of several subs and their targets are included.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Summer 1992, p18-20, il, por
Record #:
34710
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Abstract:
The morning of December 30, 1941, the convoy vessel ALEXANDER HAMILTON pulled away from Norfolk Harbor to escort ships from Newfoundland to Europe. As early as 1939, German U-boats were actively patrolling the North Atlantic, targeting merchant ships. By 1942, an estimated 360 vessels had been attacked, leading to the formation of a convoy system. ALEXANDER HAMILTON, crewed by several Carteret County residents, arrived in Newfoundland on January 12, 1942. Joining a convoy of 35 cargo vessels and 6 destroyers, the vessel proceeded into the North Atlantic and soon received reports of nearby submarine activity. On January 29, 1942, torpedoes from the U-132 struck HAMILTON on the starboard side, killing twenty crew members including Livingston Brooks, the first Carteret County native killed in World War II.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2005, p21-25, il, por
Record #:
34764
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Abstract:
Following the United States entrance into World War II in 1942, the battle for the north Atlantic was going poorly. Over 600 ships and six million tons of shipping were destroyed by German U-boats. These engagements became known as a wild turkey shoot. Vessels offshore from Morehead City and Beaufort were seen damaged and sinking on a daily basis; they were often attacked by German forces during the night. The Morehead City hospital was expanded to increase services to burned and injured sailors.
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