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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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164 results for "North Carolina Naturalist"
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Record #:
34613
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The Prairie Ridge outdoor education facility of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences opened its doors in 2004. Since then, many of the goals of the facility have been met, including a green classroom, a native garden, and trails through the land. They plan to continue research into bee studies, chimney swift surveys, and more after-school and at-risk youth programs.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 22 Issue 4, Fall 2014, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
39512
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Among the things North Carolina Natural Museum’s staff voted as the best from its Nature Exploration Center and Nature Research Center: Diving Pelican, Coastal Hall Exhibit; Mountains to the Sea; Maine Lobster, Arthropod Zoo; Window on Animal Health; Micro World iLab; and Touchable Meteorites.
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Record #:
21043
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While this article cannot mention all the fossil sites in the state, it does serve as a brief guide to some of the more interesting ones. Among those listed with a brief description are the Triassic reptiles of the Research Triangle; Cretaceous Carolina: Traces of the dinosaurs; and Megalodon cruising grounds.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2011, p4-7, il
Record #:
21027
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There are 58 different species of salamanders found in the state--the densest concentration anywhere in the world. Schulte describes the marbled salamander, which has a unique reproductive custom--it lays its eggs out of water.
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Record #:
34556
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New undertakings at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences puts the spotlight on paleontology. The museum’s collection has grown, including fossils from species native to the region as well as those from around the world. Working with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as opened up the possibility of further collaboration in order to ensure research that highlights native prehistoric species.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall/Winter 1998, p2-7, il, por, map
Record #:
35350
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Abstract:
As Emily Matthews alluded, this snipe’s tale could have ended from its collision into the NC Museum of Art facility. Through the efforts of the corpse’s discoverer and preservation tactics such as storage and tagging, though, this bird is part of the NCMoA’s collections.
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Record #:
35389
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This article, a companion to “What a Croc: Introducing the Carolina Butcher,” discussed the fossilized remains of a dinosaur that existed in NC at the same time as the Carolina Butcher. Included in the article was the number of remains, unique anatomical features, and how Aetosaurs came to be the ancestor to the crocodile.
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Record #:
21014
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Abstract:
Almost a year ago an Eastern screech owl arrived at the NC Museum of Natural Science from the Carolina Raptor Center in Charlotte. The owl had been struck by a car and the accident had left it nearly blind. If returned to the wild, the owl would die because of its inability to find food; however, it now has a future as part of the museum's educational programs.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p5, il
Record #:
35428
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Abstract:
Profiled was the North Carolina Museum of Art’s 20th Annual Bugfest, touted by the author as the single largest bug-centric event held in the United States. This article discussed the theme of that year’s event, ants. Also noted was two Museum ant experts and their NCSU colleague’s list of seven favorite ants, which included the Exploding Ant and Indian Jumping Ant.
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Record #:
24841
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Abstract:
Dr. Adrian Smith presents her knowledge about ants, specifically Western long-legged harvester ants. She describes some general facts about ants as well as facts more specific to her line of study. She presents the findings of research she has done involving orphan ants and what is called the ‘queen’s death mark.’
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Winter 2016, p4-5, il
Record #:
20842
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences will open soon with ten major exhibits. In this continuing series on the exhibits, Walters takes readers behind the scenes to describe how the exhibit on arthropods is taking shape.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Spr/Sum 1999, p10-11, il
Record #:
21011
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Abstract:
Sea turtles, especially the most common one--the loggerhead--that live along the state's coast are becoming threatened and in need of help by mankind. This presents an ironic situation because humans, the only group with the skills to help turtle survive, are also the group that inflicts the most harm to them. For example, plastic bottle strips tossed into the ocean where turtle get entangled or eat them and large gill nets used by fishermen all are threats to the turtles.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Fall/Win 2006, p6-8, il
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Record #:
21051
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Previously the veterinary staff at the NC Museum of Natural Science, under the direction of Chief Veterinarian Dr. Dan Dombrowski, looked after the health of animals away from the public. This article describes the new clinic which is designed to allow visitors to see activities in the lab and procedure room and also ask questions about what is happening.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spr 2012, p6-7, il
Record #:
34574
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences has begun breeding a special species of seahorse. Hippocampus erectus, one of two native species to North Carolina, have dwindled in number in the wild. The breeding program will not only help bolster the exhibits here in North Carolina, but also afford the opportunity to trade with other museums for live animals that are not on exhibit at the museum.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 11 Issue 3, Win 2003, p11-14, il, por
Record #:
35391
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Abstract:
Information about skunk offspring, as well as the female skunk’s birthing and spraying habits, were the focus of the article. Included was also the question about what came first: the ability to spray or the motive to develop this ability?
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