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29 results for Wineries
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Record #:
34954
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Pender County, North Carolina hosts a small vineyard called Bannerman Vineyard and Winery. A small operation of 18-acres, the winery creates only muscadine wines and juices, but still have created a loyal following of fans, some as far away as Maryland and Ohio.
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34982
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In 2005, Treehouse Vineyards settled in Monroe, North Carolina. Not only do they make award-winning wine, but they also offer a unique way to view the vineyard: from a treehouse. Since opening to the public in 2010, owners Phil and Dianne Nordan have created three different treehouses that can be rented for events and parties.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 8, January 2017, p48-50, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
41180
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While Thanksgiving may primarily revolve around food and the spirit of giving, the wines should also fit into the theme. In the spirit of Thanksgiving, purchase wines that give back to the community in the forms of wineries that give a portion of their proceeds to various charity or nonprofit groups.
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Record #:
27410
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There are now 34 wineries in Western North Carolina located across 6 districts, which include Buncombe County, Henderson, & Polk Counties, and other more mountainous areas of western North Carolina. There are tours and tastings available for the various wineries.
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Record #:
22487
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Chris Choinski's B&C Winery, a Waynesville wine-crafting business, began as a hobby and now not only sells handcrafted wines, but offers help to others interested in home brewing.
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Record #:
23152
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Bay Sire Winery, Bistro & Ale is an upscale restaurant and winery in Jackson, North Carolina. Owner and developer, Jemma Cox, does not harvest her own grapes, but rather purchases them from all over the world, and then ferments and bottles wine under the Bay Sire label. The Bay Sire also serves delicious food and ale.
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Record #:
22041
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Spencer discusses the beer and wine industry in the state, as well as new emerging distilleries. The state has strict laws that liquor cannot flow as freely as beer and wine. The state also has a reputation for making illegal moonshine, but anyone with the right permits can distil liquor. Although Prohibition repeal was decades ago, the state's first legal distillery did not open till ten years ago. Now there are 14 distilleries in North Carolina, compared to 146 wineries and 82 breweries.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Feb 2014, p22, 24-25, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
16563
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Ensrud recommends a series of excellent North Carolina-made wines as well as road trip-worthy wineries in the State.
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Record #:
10231
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North Carolina's wine industry pumps a billion dollars into the state's economy. Williams discusses challenges facing the industry.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 7, July 2008, p26-27, il
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Record #:
10495
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One of North Carolina's newest niche economies is its growing wine industry. From Moonrise Bay Vineyard at the northern tip of the Outer Banks to Asheville's Biltmore Estate, North Carolina has 400 vineyards and around 72 wineries in 30 counties. The industry employs a workforce of over 5,700 with a payroll of about $159 million.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 32, Aug 2008, p17-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29657
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North Carolina is now one of the best places in the country to enjoy wine. As the wine industry has grown since 2000 with double the acres of grape vines and triple the wineries, wine tourism has also grown. An estimated 800,000 tourists come to North Carolina for the wine each year, with an economic impact of $813 million.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p52-53, por
Record #:
9412
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Williams explores the wine country of the northern crescent of the Yadkin River Valley, which stretches through the counties of Surry, Wilkes, and Yadkin. He describes a number of wineries and accommodations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 4, Sept 2007, p200-202, 204, 206-207, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7812
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Currently there are fifty-three wineries in the state, with ten more expected in 2006, and another twenty in 2007. State winemakers face a formidable array of challenges: Pierce's Disease, grape root borers, Ph factors, Supreme Court rulings, the weather, budgeting, and marketing. Still, 600,000 gallons of wine, valued at $34 million, were produced and sold in 2004, making the state the twelfth largest wine producer in the country. Vineyards and wineries create around 835 jobs and have an economic impact of $79 million.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 4, Apr 2006, p14, 17,-19, 21-22, 24, 26, il
Record #:
8019
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Wineries are growing in North Carolina. In 2001, fifteen or so were producing wines. By 2006, the number of wineries had grown to fifty-three. They range from the grandeur of Biltmore Estate to cottage operations like Hanover Park. A number of wineries like Shelton, RayLen, Childress, and Westbend, have put the state on the national wine scene with award-winning wines.
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Record #:
24206
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Duplin Winery is a family operated business in Duplin County. The author discusses the history of how it became the biggest winery in the Southeast.
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