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25 results for "Portsmouth Island--History"
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Record #:
29897
Abstract:
Born on Portsmouth Island, North Carolina in 1901, Steve Roberts and his love of Portsmouth has continued even when his family moved to Morehead City. Oystering and help from neighbors kept the community prosperous, while singing, traditions, and dreams kept the community together. But storms and changing beaches pushed the decline of Portsmouth Island in the end.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p22-27, por
Record #:
34650
Abstract:
During the 17th century, North American colonial merchants were responsible for conducting coastal trade and assumed all responsibility for shipping, storing, and selling trade goods. While this system fell out of practice during the 18th century in many North American colonies, it remained the primary trade system in Carteret County. The town of Portsmouth is one example of this system. Established in 1754, town residents facilitated handling and transportation of merchant cargoes throughout the Outer Banks. A customs official was stationed in Portsmouth to inspect and tax goods coming in and out of the county.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p25-26, map
Record #:
34672
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Colonial period, sheep were popular livestock raised throughout Carteret County. The wool was used for home spun clothing while lamb and mutton were staples in the local diet. Sheep were so prevalent that Portsmouth Island was also known as “Sheep Island.”
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p5, map
Record #:
34751
Author(s):
Abstract:
The island of Portsmouth, located 25 miles from mainland North Carolina, was valued for raising livestock. During the early 19th century, sheep, horses, cattle, and goats were reared by the small community. Storm activity in the early 1800s threatened the livestock on the island as it destroyed much of their grazing areas. Apart from these animals, the island served little agricultural purpose as only sweet potatoes were well adapted to the salty soil.
Source:
Record #:
34746
Author(s):
Abstract:
Portsmouth Island was home to sailing captains, fishermen, lighters, hunters, and wrackers in the historic era. This community was dependent on the ocean and island resources. While the residents have long vanished, their stories remain preserved in a number of buildings on the island. The Methodist church and personal cemeteries bear witness to the past lives which created the small community.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p11-15, il
Record #:
34972
Author(s):
Abstract:
Portsmouth Island sits on the southern tip of the Outer Banks in North Carolina. Once a booming fishing and shipping town, it now sits abandoned except by tourists. Every two years, descendants of the island’s residents hold a reunion to celebrate the influence of Portsmouth in their lives.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p122-130, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35555
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Core Sound was a village that might be rightly called a ghost town. Not a single living inhabitant resides there, as anyone who visits by ferry, beach buggy, or air can attest. In fact, only two things remained in a town the author proclaimed held promise upon its founding in 1753. One is the physical reminders of lifeways gone by, like an enclave of houses and outbuildings maintained by the owners’ descendants. Another was memories of life in a town that started its long, gradual decline by the early nineteenth century.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p12-15, 29
Record #:
35556
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a companion article to “Portsmouth Island Stands in the Backwash of Time” was a profile of the last permanent resident of the Core Sound town. Profiled was Henry Piggott, resident during the sum of his seventy four years and now resident of the family cemetery. Profiled also was the small pink house in which Piggott resided. The dwelling held remnants of lifeways gone by, such as the kitchen and bathroom as separate buildings.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p16-17
Record #:
37370
Abstract:
Getting to Portsmouth Island is a challenge but the journey is worth the effort, according to the author. Among the perks Portsmouth has to offer is an environment that may make one feel as if a trip has been taken back in time. Reason noted by Rumley for this feeling: Portsmouth’s population has dwindled to summer tourists and fishermen; the place hasn’t changed much since its Colonial beginnings.
Record #:
36014
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of personal interest to the author were also items of historical interest. Up close and personal was the view that he offered of sunken ships, as well as the marine life that lived around them. As visual illustration was a map locating the wrecked watercrafts, which included a German submarine. Accompanying the map was a brief description of each: an old boiler, LST#741, Richmond, Kyzickes, Zane Gray, U-85, and York.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p10-13, map