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22 results for Surles, Kathryn B
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Record #:
1913
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1992 the Governor's Task Force on Health Objectives for the Year 2000 published objectives addressing health concerns in 11 broad areas, such as AIDS. The report identifies special target populations - African-Americans and native Americans.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 77, Nov 1993, p1-17, il, bibl
Record #:
1918
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1990 Census indicates that one in every four persons in North Carolina is a member of a minority group. Surles presents race-specific analyses of the socio-demographic characteristics of North Carolina's minorities.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 72, Apr 1993, p1-31, il, bibl
Record #:
2161
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some areas of adolescent (ages 10-19) health, such as infant mortality and motor vehicle mortality, have improved in the state; however, the rates of adolescent pregnancy, unmarried childbearing, sexually transmitted disease, and suicide continue to rise.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 89, Jan 1995, p1-66, il, bibl
Record #:
2302
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are few positive health trends in children ages birth to 9. Although the infant death rate has decreased, child abuse has increased. Moreover, health disparities remain between minority and white children.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 93, May 1995, p1-61, il, bibl
Record #:
3931
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some 904 people committed suicide in 1995. The number of suicides per 100,000 increased from 11.2 in 1980 to 12.6 in 1995. Among the old, white males have the highest rate. Among younger minorities and younger males, the rate is increasing. Two-thirds of all suicides result from use of firearms.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 110, Aug 1998, p1-11, il, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
4047
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the years 1987-88 and 1995-96, considerable progress was made toward the reduction of birthweight-specific infant mortality. Expanded child and maternal care were contributing factors to the decline. However, other factors, including smoking mothers and minority race, continue to be strong predictors of low birthweight. These factors still need to be addressed.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 112, Jan 1999, p1-7, il, bibl
Record #:
4132
Author(s):
Abstract:
Multiple births rose forty percent in the state between 1980 and 1997. Contributing factors are women who wait until later in life to have children and women who use infertility therapies. Multiple birth babies tend to have low birthweight, serious health problems, and to die soon after birth.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 114, Mar 1999, p1-7, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
5524
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, high mortality was found among men working in such low status jobs as proprietors and sales supervisors, and in such industries as repair services, logging, construction, and trucking.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 47, Dec 1988, p1-50, il, bibl
Record #:
29391
Author(s):
Abstract:
This comprehensive report depicts the health status and health habits of North Carolinians over a twenty-year period. Statistics and trends are provided for a variety of characteristics pertaining to pregnancy, mortality, morbidity, healthcare, and demographics.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 28, Dec 1983, p1-64, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29402
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina and across the United States, birth rates have steadily fallen over the past several decades. In recent years, however, both the birth rate and the induced abortion rate of older women have risen, and first-time births among women of ages thirty and older have risen sharply. Problems that may be associated with delayed and limited childbearing are examined and discussed in this report.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 38, Sep 1985, p1-16, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29399
Author(s):
Abstract:
The State Center for Health Statistics conducted an analysis of race-specific sociodemographic, natality, mortality, and morbidity data focusing on the relative status of North Carolina’s American Indian residents. Data are provided separately for reservation and non-reservation Indians.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 35, June 1985, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
29409
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the period 1978-1986 in North Carolina, nonwhite abortion was negatively correlated with the fertility rate and the fetal and neonatal death rates of nonwhite infants born in the same year. The correlation varied by age, education, income, marital, and birth-order categories.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 45, June 1988, p1-12, bibl, f
Record #:
29393
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Health Services monitors and reports child deaths at regular intervals in hope that increased awareness will result in appropriate intervention. A special focus of this report is poor children, specifically, those whose families receive Aid to Families with Dependent Children. Data and analysis of child mortality are presented, and categorized by age and cause of death.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 29, Dec 1983, p1-9, bibl, f
Record #:
1932
Abstract:
The Community Diagnosis process in North Carolina identifies health problems locally and communicates these problems to the state. It is hoped this approach will assist in allocating funds on a priority basis to meet documented health needs.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 63, Apr 1992, p1-7, il
Record #:
3600
Abstract:
Hospital discharge rates, length of stays, and charges revealed higher discharge rates for heart disease in the state than in the nation and increases in knee and hip replacements.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 109, Jan 1998, p1-14