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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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38 results for "Cecelski, David"
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Record #:
3610
Author(s):
Abstract:
The kitchen garden at Tryon Palace measured 16,200 square feet and was enclosed by an eight-foot-high wall. It provided the governor foods of American, European, and African origin, including squash and okra. Some, like salsify, are not common today.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 1998, p18-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3677
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1869 to 1870, David Coues was Army surgeon at Fort Macon. He spent endless hours studying the wildlife and writing about it. His efforts put Bogue Banks on the naturalist's map. Coues later became the foremost ornithologist of his time.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3700
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Abstract:
Long-buried state documents, including field notes, transcripts, surveillance reports, and registers of members, reveal Ku Klux Klan activities during the 1960s. Over one hundred groups, with about 7,000 official members, existed statewide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 15, Mar 1997, p11-15, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
3728
Author(s):
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At the beginning of the 20th-century, the tiny town of Navassa in Brunswick County was the home of Wilmington's most important industry--guano fertilizer. The Navassa Guano Company was founded in 1869, and the town grew up around it.
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Record #:
3813
Author(s):
Abstract:
An unlikely pairing on Hatteras Island in 1923 of an illiterate, self-taught midwife, Bathsheba Foster (\"Mis' Bashi\") and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine graduate Blanche Nettleton Epler provides a picture of maternity care and the dangers women faced in childbirth a hundred years ago.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , High Season 1998, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
3883
Author(s):
Abstract:
Paleoecologist Sherri Cooper of Duke University is studying core samples from the Neuse and Pamlico estuaries to build a history of the water quality over the centuries. Such studies may reveal some answers about how water quality declined and how possibly it might be regained.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1998, p24-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3934
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bayard Wootten, who was born in New Bern in 1875, is one of the state's most noted photographers. Her career spanned fifty years, and her photographs of the Great Depression are among her best-known works.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1998, p18-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4784
Author(s):
Abstract:
Englishwoman Catharine Phillips, a Quaker missionary, evangelized in the North Carolina coastal regions and as far west as Alamance County, beginning in 1753. Phillips wrote an account of her travels and work in Memories of the Life of Catharine Phillips, which was published in London in 1797.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2000, p26-29, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4851
Author(s):
Abstract:
Goshen, in Jones County, was one of the first African American towns settled at the close of the Civil War. The author recounts the history of the community gleaned from visits with Goshen resident Hattie Brown, who learned the history from her grandmother.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2000, p27-29, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
5716
Author(s):
Abstract:
Camden's Moses Grandy, a waterman from the 1790s to the 1830s, wrote THE NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF MOSES GRANDY, WHO WAS A SLAVE IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, the only account of maritime life in the state written by a former slave.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p6-13, f
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Record #:
19509
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the 2005 closing of Beaufort Fisheries, North Carolina's last menhaden factory, there has been an outpouring of interest in the history of the menhaden industry in the state.
Full Text:
Record #:
21127
Author(s):
Abstract:
The unique maritime culture of North Carolina has been an inspiration for naturalists, folklorists, historians, poets and novelists for centuries as they have been drawn to the coasts. A strong North Carolina fishing culture initially drew many people, however, pollution, over-development, and poor fishery management, the culture is in decline. Writers and historians continue to record and preserve this culture in their respective works.
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Record #:
21447
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines of the ecological and cultural contexts for understanding the man-made seasonal camps used by mullet fishermen as well as exploring the architectural and material traits that were both specifically suited to the coastal environment as well as being drawn from African American building traditions to meet the special needs of the mullet fishery.
Record #:
21589
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 19th century before the Civil War, escaped slaves and their collaborators established escape routes by sea to leave North Carolina. This version of the Underground Railroad in Wilmington and other sea ports were so effective during the 1st half of the century that runaway slaves often ran to the coast instead of heading north to reach freedom through overland routes.
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Record #:
26374
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina oyster industry began its ascent in the 1880s, bringing together local laborers and Chesapeake oystermen to develop a thriving economy. With this prosperity, however, came controversy and overharvesting. Now oysters have practically vanished from North Carolina.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Fall 2000, p8-9, il
Subject(s):