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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 4 Issue 2, Dec 1956
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Record #:
16510
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Abstract:
Local legends and place-names constitute a part of popular history. Although they usually contain more fancy than fact, they possess a charm that appeals to all. This article is a sampling of what North Carolina has to offer in the way of local lore and legend concerning place names.
Record #:
35132
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This is a list of remedies that can be made at the home for ailments such as itchiness, wounds, coughing, and more serious illnesses like the measles.
Record #:
35133
Abstract:
The author composed this ballad about how the island of Ocracoke got its name from legends told to her as she was en route to the island, having to do with the infamous pirate Blackbeard.
Record #:
35127
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Abstract:
The story of how a giant worm, also called a dragon, terrorized a town until it was slain. The knight who killed the worm had help from a witch, and he and his family was then cursed for not following the witch’s directions precisely.
Record #:
35129
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A song composed by the author complete with the lyrics and sheet music, based upon a story she had read about in a Raleigh newspaper. It was a story about two young girls fighting over a spool of thread, which turned into a family debacle.
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Record #:
35134
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A letter, in the form of a ballad, was sent by the author and his sister to his brother David, essentially catching up since their last correspondence.
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Record #:
35128
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A letter written by a store clerk in Mississippi about a wedding the after effects of what must have been a very fun house party.
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Record #:
35135
Abstract:
The widow, Grace Greenlee Bowman, wrote a short poem about her husband’s passing.
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Record #:
35130
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A letter written to Daniel Turner in 1864 by the widow Peebles, professing her longing to see him since the war had ended.
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