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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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123 results for "Carolina Gardener"
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Record #:
34806
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As the population of North Carolina becomes more diverse, so too does the variety of greenery and vegetables in gardens all over the state. African and Asian varieties are especially popular, with the introduction of plants like bitter melon, bok choy, cassava, and rice.
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Record #:
34800
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Broccoli is a fairly adaptive vegetable to grow and well-suited for the Carolinas. This article discusses where, when, and how to grow broccoli in your home garden, as well as the best varieties to grow in North Carolina.
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Record #:
34804
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Pears are one of the hardiest and easiest fruiting trees to plant in North Carolina. Not only do they yield fruit early, but they are also cost-effective, can cross-pollinate, and sprout beautiful white flowers in the Spring.
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Record #:
34801
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Cauliflower is a more difficult vegetable to grow but is well-suited for some areas in the Carolinas. This article discusses where, when, and how to grow cauliflower in your home garden, as well as the best places to buy seeds in North Carolina.
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Record #:
34809
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Bacterial spot and bacterial speck have both become large issues for many regions across North and South Carolina. It mostly materializes on tomato plants but can also spread to peppers and eggplants if not properly treated. Spraying and planting in pots can help deter bacterial rot in plants.
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Record #:
34811
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Nan and Saul Chase have cultivated a once-bare plot in Asheville into a thriving kitchen garden. All plants within the tiny .09 acre lot are edible, and include hot peppers, crabapples, berry bushes, and other varieties of vegetable.
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Record #:
34808
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A wide variety of pumpkins can be grown in the Carolinas. They need plenty of space, sun, water, and good soil in order to grow. This article gives tips and tricks to ensuring that your next pumpkin crop is healthy.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 3, April 2017, p54-55, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34810
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Blueberries are a hardy, versatile fruit-bearing shrub that does well in the Carolinas. This article outlines the ways to grow and care for blueberry bushes and which variety to choose in each climate.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 4, May 2017, p54-55, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34825
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Biltmore Estates in Asheville, North Carolina has a long history of stunning landscaping and gardens. Garden designer Clare Whittington discusses their procedure for planning out the gardens that surround the massive 8,000 acre estate, and how home gardeners can use the same tools.
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Record #:
34827
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Old Salem, located on the outskirts of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, host spectacular historical gardens. All vegetables, flowers, and herbs grown at the gardens are historically accurate to what one would find prior to the 1800s. Garden plots are also based off of Moravian documents that have survived through time.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 8, October 2017, p56-60, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34828
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Abstract:
Despite citrus plants not naturally occurring in the Carolinas, it is possible to grow them. Lemons, limes, and oranges can all be grown, but must have extra attention to ensure they don’t fail. Follow the tips and tricks in this article to ensure your citrus plants are healthy.
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Record #:
34826
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This quick guide to public gardens in the Carolinas highlights two in North Carolina: Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden and Tryon Palace. Special emphasis is placed on Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden and their award-winning displays.
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Record #:
36191
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Reuse, recycle, and renew are buzz words generated by the ongoing environmental crisis. Ways wine bottles can be used after the party ends are ecologically conscious, creative, and practical. Uses included plant labels, row covers securers, and floral wreath additions.
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Record #:
36193
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The cover alluded to is mulch, produced naturally to promote wild plant growth. Materials recommended for creating mulch are wood bark/chips, leaves, and straw or hay. Additional incentive to use mulch in gardens were the downside of not having mulch as a natural protectant for plants.
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Record #:
36192
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With the long established health hazards of smoking, it may seem ironic that tobacco would be included with Teosinte, Chiltepin Pepper, and a variety of Petunia as good garden additions. The beauty of its flowers and natural insecticide may make it easier to understand why tobacco is not too far out to consider.
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