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36 results for Wetlands
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Record #:
28450
Abstract:
Ecologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute of Marine Sciences are gathering new information about the effectiveness and outlook of restored wetlands in Wilson Bay. They are also measuring surface elevation and water quality in the marshes.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2017, p32-35, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27622
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Abstract:
The General Assembly passed a regulatory reform bill removing environmental protections from isolated wetlands that are under one acre in size. The bill will benefit coastal developers and lessen regulations for polluters. Wetlands store water, provide habitat for endangered species, and reduce flooding during tropical storms. Additional effects on wetlands are explored.
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Record #:
12447
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This article features communities that successfully integrated water resource management into urban sustainability efforts.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 35 Issue , Summer 2010, p31-42, map, f
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Record #:
8371
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PSC Phosphate, Inc., has applied to the Army Corps of Engineers for a Clean Water Act Section 404 permit to impact and fill wetlands and waters of the state for the purpose of continuing their mining operations along South Creek in eastern Beaufort County. A similar grant that allowed the company to impact over 1,200 acres of wetlands in 1997 resulted in the largest permitted destruction of wetlands in the history of the state. If the new permit is granted, the Pamlico River basin would lose 2,500 acres of high-quality wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 2006, p1, 3, map
Record #:
25066
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Abstract:
Storm water regulations are hard to enforce. However, the city of Smithfield has found a way to do it through wetlands with great success. It has helped not only the storm water pollution, but the community as well.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2004, p16-20, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2168
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's species of salamanders, frogs, and toads are facing an uncertain future as wetland habitats, which serve as breeding grounds are developed or drained. Approximately fifty percent of the state's permanent wetlands have been destroyed.
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Record #:
2203
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Generally, a freshwater marsh is a temporary wetland, existing until filled by sediment washing downstream. During its lifetime, the marsh provides food and shelter for plants and animals and also stores excess water when floods occur.
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Record #:
2202
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Seasonal wetlands are small areas that are wet only for a short period during the year. Some of the smallest of the state's wetlands, seasonal wetlands can be as little as two meters in diameter.
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Record #:
2207
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As the state's economy has grown, upwards of 50 percent of its wetlands have been lost. This statistic is questionable, however, because of a lack of data on the original extent of wetlands and disagreement over when a wetland is actually lost.
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Record #:
2206
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Some wetlands, such as swamps and marshes, are easily identifiable. Others, though, are dry several months each year. Wet or dry, both must meet three criteria to be classified as a wetland: wetland vegetation, hydric (wet) soil, and water evidence.
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Record #:
25214
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The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation details its aims with the Environmental Conservation Statement it made regarding Texasgulf’s request to mine in the wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 3, Spring 1994, p1
Record #:
25217
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Various agencies voice their concerns and comments on the Texasgulf request to mine phosphate from several wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 4, Summer 1994, p1-2
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Record #:
225
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North Carolina ecologists view wetlands as the sustainers of the well-being of coastal waters, while the timber industry, companies such as Weyerhaueser, Union Camp, and Champion International, view wetlands as places for the harvesting and growing of timber.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1992, p10-14, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25192
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The legal battle over the protection of wetlands continues and is contended all the way up to the federal level. Many factors are at play from big oil companies to environmental considerations.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Winter 1992, p4, il
Record #:
34205
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to a recent report by the Water Quality Section of the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management, half of North Carolina’s original coastal wetlands acreage is functionally impaired. The report considers that wetlands impacted by agriculture and urban development are nonsupporting, while those impacted by forestry are partially supporting.
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