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22 results for Cemeteries
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Record #:
35728
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author proved a sojourn in the state capital captured the essence of NC. Those interested in its history could visit folk villages, the Dodd-Hinsdale House, and Oakwood Cemetery. Visitors wanting entertainment could take in concerts, dance, and sports. Tours about town could yield sightings of the Sacred Heart Cathedral, sidewalk cafes, and working farms. For nature lovers, there were boating in the Neuse River and strolling through gardens such as the Rose Garden.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p42-44
Record #:
36889
Abstract:
Visiting several cemeteries in Jackson County’s Canada Township, the author happened across a cemetery style that he had not seen before, found in three different cemeteries. The style was a bare earth mound, meaning the graves were mounded up and kept clear of grass and weeds, and then covered with a thick layer of white gravel to maintain the shape and suppress growth of grass.
Record #:
37016
Abstract:
One woodsman proves that some tools are still standard, despite the ubiquity of digital based technology. His promotion of horse power is extended to teaching students from Appalachian State how to use this tool. Tasks mentioned by the author where horse power is useful included cleaning debris from a graveyard or clearing a mountainside for a bird habitat.
Record #:
35819
Author(s):
Abstract:
To many, Rolesville could have been a “blink and you miss it” kind of small town. What made the town near Raleigh hard to pass by was being near the “Unique Grave.” What made the grave unique was its location: inside of a rock. What also made it unique: the story about the tomb created for a man not wanting his earthly remains in the earth.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p16
Record #:
36893
Abstract:
Crawford is a folklore researcher of all the old families between Waynesville and Bryson City, North Carolina. His work deepens and expands the appreciation, continuation, and study of the cemetery decoration traditions the figure in the lives of the people of Western North Carolina.
Record #:
36574
Author(s):
Abstract:
Church picnics on the grounds meant the occasion took place in its churchyard or cemetery. As for the day designated, sometimes it was Decoration Day, at other times a cemetery cleanup or homecoming. No matter the day or occasion, it always involved traditional Appalachian dishes, illustrated in the accompanying photo. The author noted recipes such as dried green beans cooked with fatback called “leather britches” and stack cake made with alternating layers of cake and dried fruit.
Record #:
39441
Author(s):
Abstract:
Creech reviews Patterson’s book on gravestones. The gravestones give brief glimpses of the dead that can be linked to anecdotes and legends recorded early by local Presbyterians, helping the author focus on individuals taking roles in crises within the community, enabling him to help the reader see them and their long-vanished world.