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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Bees
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Record #:
24037
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Bee City USA is a program under the Center for Honeybee Research, a non-profit organization in Asheville. The program seeks to protect native pollinators and raise awareness about the importance of bees, populations of which have been shrinking as a result of pesticides and lack of nearby crop diversity.
Record #:
34823
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Gary Pierce, a North Carolina resident, decided to begin beekeeping to help support local farms. In North Carolina, crop pollination is heavily reliant on individuals with small scale beekeeping (less than twenty five hives). As bees are important to the state, there are several beekeepers who are employed as hive inspectors. These individuals visit hives and aid in running diagnostic tests. Pierce had several issues with one hive which necessitated a visit from the inspector. While the visit was not successful, Pierce concludes that bees remain an important aspect of the North Carolina economy. All in all, he believes that beekeeping is worth the sting.
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Record #:
4218
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Steve and Sandy Forest started Brushy Mountain Bee Farm in their kitchen over twenty years ago. The farm, located near Wadesboro, had revenues of over $2 million in 1998. The Forests not only raise bees and sell honey, but they also have a web site, publish a catalog, and supply beekeepers worldwide with supplies through a mail-order service.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 1, June 1999, p18, 20-22, 24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34385
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Ben Rose of Roper is a master beekeeper and his honeybees are a crucial link in the development of a wide variety of crops. Without bees to pollinate the plants, there would be nothing to harvest. As one of the few commercial beekeepers in North Carolina, Rose transports his bees to various locations where crops need pollinating.
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Record #:
35383
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Trey Lee and authors from ScienceX Magazine were among the producers of this issue’s articles. Two studied microbes’ impact on humans and humans’ impact on endangered species such as freshwater mussels and Raleigh’s Umstead State Park’s wildlife. Two others discussed taxonomy and remains of two WWII marine vessels. Three profiled honeybees, deep diving birds like the gannet, and a program teaching natural science to special populations
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 4, Fall 2016, p7-10
Record #:
35397
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Animals of the mammal, insect, and reptile varieties, two programs designed to educate students about science, and a herpetologist were discussed in the sextet of articles part of this edition.
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Record #:
35430
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This quartet of profiles for this article covered topics. It ranged from the Dragonfly Detectives Program; new queen bee cells introduced to the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Discovery Room’s Observation Hive; a review of Caren Cooper’s Citizen Science: How Ordinary People are Changing the Face of Science; Dr. Adrian Smith, winner of the 2016 Early Career Professional Outreach and Public Engagement Award.
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Record #:
36589
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Sharing genetic material with the Scutellata, the bees Sean Collingsworth keeps are the Italian and Carniolan varieties. His relatively harmless hive dwellers, supping on nectar untainted by pesticides, produce what he touted as honey high in quality because of its purity.
Record #:
36200
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Essential to garden growth are pollinators, or creatures involved in plant pollination. Examples of insect pollinators are the mason bee and flower fly. Mammal pollinators include hummingbirds. To keep them replenishing the plant supply, the author suggested diversifying the types of flowers by type and shape.
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Record #:
36199
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This type of garden can nourish all, by lowering harmful insect populations and maintaining pollinator populations. Plants nourishing for farm animals include Artemisia and marigold. Examples of plants nourishing for humans are sponge gourd and sheep sorrel. Plants discouraging pests are bay laurel and mint. Plants good for insects include spicebush and dill.
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Record #:
31161
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North Carolina benefits from having more than ten-thousand beekeepers, more than any state in the nation. The state also ranks among the top ten in number of beehives, and most of these belong to hobbyists with a passion for keeping bees. This article discusses the history of beekeeping, the importance of bees in pollination, and the production of honey.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 8, Aug 2003, p22-23, il
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