NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


29 results for "Water resources development"
Currently viewing results 16 - 29
Previous
PAGE OF 2
Record #:
33583
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Clean Water Loan and Grant Fund of 1987 was created by the General Assembly to provide low-interest loans and some grants to local governments for construction of wastewater and water supply projects. The Division of Environmental Management is accepting applications for a broad range of activities. Details about the program are provided in this article.
Record #:
34069
Author(s):
Abstract:
Local governments in North Carolina are taking advantage of water supply and water quality protection opportunities offered by the State’s Agricultural Cost Share Program by supplementing funding for local technical assistance. The program currently shares with farmers the cost of installing runoff controls for watershed conservation.
Record #:
34077
Author(s):
Abstract:
Groundwater protection in North Carolina, which primarily the responsibility of the Groundwater Section of the Division of Environmental Management, has been strengthened considerably over the past several years by many research and assessment efforts and by regulatory developments. The groundwater protection program aims to prevent pollution by facilities that generate or treat waste, restore polluted groundwater, and plan for the wise use and development of groundwater resources.
Record #:
34117
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources is reviewing comments in preparation for making final recommendations for allocating water supply storage in Jordan Lake to local water authorities. In a draft allocation plan, the towns of Cary and Apex and Chatham/Orange Counties will receive all the water supply they requested to fill immediate need, but most long-range allocations will be deferred.
Record #:
34188
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Town of Cary, North Carolina has developed a groundwater system which can provide the town supplemental water on a cost-effective basis. Development of the system was based on site selection criteria by the United States Geological Survey, and supports the contention that wells in the Piedmont can yield much larger quantities of water than previously thought. According to a recent report, the groundwater system was needed because of anticipated increases in the cost of purchasing water and surcharges for additional water from the City of Raleigh.
Record #:
34208
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources conducted a study at Currituck County Outer Banks in response to property owners requesting a Capacity Use Area designation under the Water Use Act of 1967. This would restrict water withdrawals from the surficial aquifer, which is the sole source of drinking water for Currituck. The study concluded that if a management plan is not prepared by 2000, then the designation should be considered.
Record #:
34203
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the United States Geological Survey’s National Water Conditions, temperatures were above normal throughout most of the nation in July. In North Carolina, streamflow values declined statewide for the third month in a row but remained at average to slightly above average levels. Rainfall, streamflow, groundwater, and reservoir levels in July and August are presented in this article.
Record #:
34214
Author(s):
Abstract:
Connelly Springs, a small town in Burke County, will soon have drinking water thanks to the assistance from a new program within the Construction Grants and Loans Section of the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management. By 1995, the town will have completed a distribution system that will allow access to the county’s water supply. Construction is being done by residents as part of the loan agreements under the North Carolina Small Community Self-Help Program.
Record #:
34225
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Groundwater Section of the Division of Environmental Management is developing a Wellhead Protection Program as well as a Comprehensive State Groundwater Protection Program. A summary of these efforts is provided in this article.
Record #:
34256
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources is reassessing its regulation of groundwater and surface water withdrawals in Capacity Use Area #1, a multicounty area centered around Beaufort County. The Division is conducting an aquifer framework analysis and modeling groundwater flow in the Castle Hayne Aquifer as a basis for reviewing future groundwater withdrawal permit applications and assessing whether continued regulation of withdrawals in the area is necessary.
Record #:
34269
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has a network of seventy-seven continuous-record stream gages operated by the United States Geological Survey. These gages collect real-time data to help the state to respond to floods and manage water-supply systems during droughts. Currently, there are concerns about funding to maintain the network and to offset increasing maintenance costs.
Record #:
34319
Author(s):
Abstract:
A group appointed to develop a strategic plan for water and wastewater infrastructure in North Carolina must first resolve perceptions of regional bias in awarding of Clean Water Bond funds before it can address its original mission. The overall mission is to write a strategic plan for water and sewer and recommend how to come up with a dedicated fund for the plan. To get support across the state for a fund, the distribution of water and sewer funding must be perceived as fair.
Record #:
34365
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is facing the possibility of having to conserve its public water supplies to protect against an uncertain rainfall-streamflow pattern over the next several months. As the state continues to experience rapid growth, demand for public water supplies tends to follow closely. This article discusses water supplies in Wake and Mecklenburg counties and the use of quarries for expanding reservoir capacity.
Record #:
34369
Author(s):
Abstract:
On December 20, at the North Carolina Drought Management Advisory Council meeting, Governor Mike Easley stated he will bring thirty of the state’s worst hit water systems together on January 14, in Greensboro to review the status of these systems. The council will review plans for the drought and reserve sources of water.