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28 results for "Food industry and trade"
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Record #:
38216
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The promise of better food through science was recognized in two initiatives promising to generate growth in jobs, markets for farmers, and manufacturing. One was the Plant Sciences Initiative, the other the Food Processing Innovation Center. Collectively, they promised to produce greater crop numbers, pioneer crop varieties, and lower farm animals’ feed expense. Collectively, they may also help to assure the supply of food needed to feed the world’s population, projected to be 9.6 billion by 2050.
Record #:
29710
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Food cooperatives or co-ops emphasize independence and support for the local economy. Many co-ops, including Western North Carolina’s Hendersonville Food Co-op and French Broad Food Co-op, reach out to local producers and collaborate to create supply channels.
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Record #:
32958
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GoodMark Foods, Inc., with headquarters in Raleigh, is the leading United States manufacturer of meat snacks. The company’s Slim Jim, Penmican, and Penrose brand sausage products head a line of snacks that include a broad line of beef sticks and jerky, pickled sausage and pigs feet.
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Record #:
34283
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This section of Our State highlights the best places in North Carolina to find specialty items for a country meal. Places covered include meat from Smith’s Red & White in Rocky Mount, eggs from Massey Creek Farms in Madison, bread from Shiloh General Store in Hamptonville, milk from Mills River Creamery in Mills River, pimento cheese from Musten & Crutchfield in Kernersville, beer from Bestway Grocery in Greensboro, and chicken salad from Robert’s Grocery in Wrightsville Beach.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p124-144, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28313
Abstract:
The vegetable kale has the ability to draw heavy metals from soil, and consequently expose humans to lead. This study measured the concentration of lead in kale commercially obtained in Buncombe County, North Carolina. Although lead intake should be avoided whenever possible, the lead concentrations in these kale samples were detectable but negligible.
Record #:
4328
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Although he is in competition with fast-food giants like Hardees and Bojangles, Maurice Jennings has built Biscuitville into a $30 million business since it began in 1975. The company does not do giant franchises. Nor has it gone nationwide; all but five of the stores are within an hour's drive of the headquarters in Winston-Salem. Biscuitville sticks close to its biscuit theme and cuts out a dinner by closing at 2 p.m. Staying with these approaches has kept the company in dough.
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Record #:
31147
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King addresses how planners can foster the development of local food systems and provides examples from across the state.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 38 Issue , 2013, p42-44, bibl
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Record #:
33498
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Food science specialists at North Carolina State University say that present economic incentives for water conservation and waste minimization in the food industries are very strong, and assistance provided by North Carolina’s Pollution Prevention Pays Program is enhancing those incentives. Public perception has also been an important incentive for waste reduction in the food industries.
Record #:
27898
Abstract:
Students, faculty, and staff at NC State, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Duke are pursuing ways to change the food systems in their communities. These individuals are looking for ways to make systems more fair and reliant on crops and animals raised locally. Student activists are the ones who have taken the lead, pressuring their universities and communities to change their habits and provide them with organic, locally sourced foods from sustainable farms. Universities are beginning to listen and are working with students to adapt to this change.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p35-36 Periodical Website
Record #:
31300
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Abstract:
The Goodness Grows program of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture promotes the state’s produce with a label on food products. A total of 112 food producers are now participating in the program, using the distinctive Goodness Grows label on items for sale and in advertising materials.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 21 Issue 4, Apr 1989, p14, il
Record #:
30685
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According to the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, there are more than three-thousand small food businesses in the state dedicated to locally-sourced food products. Local food sales have grown significantly in the last five years, particularly in western North Carolina. This article highlights several local businesses and homegrown products relevant to the holidays.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Nov 2014, p18-19, il
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Record #:
28116
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The desire to have local and organic food available to students in the Triangle’s college dining halls is increasing. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students recently formed Fair, Local, Organic Food (FLO Flood) to advocate for the issue. The practice of having such food available is normal at Duke University. North Carolina State is beginning to look at ways to make this movement a reality. The food culture and desire of students request different food in dining halls in area universities is explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 9, February 2008, p21-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
34943
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Fayetteville businesses now sell locally produced jelly and milk products. This article highlights two businesses and the inspiration for their goods.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , October 2017, p62-65, il Periodical Website
Record #:
29800
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More people are beginning to understand the importance of local, organic food, but few know how to confront the large corporate retail chains that control what is on grocery store shelves. Local Organic Y’All is a North Carolina-based independent food advocacy group that aims to increase access to locally grown, organic food by engaging with mainstream supermarkets and wholesalers in the state.
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Record #:
10764
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Lance Inc., of Charlotte faces an increase in prices as the manufacturer makes millions in revenue. Owner George McCormick created the nickel-priced snack packs that are sold throughout the state, such as Choc-o-Lunch, Nip-Chee, and Toestee-Chee. The rise in basic food products such as wheat, sugar, and oil have reduced the profit margin for the nickel packs, though company sales have increased by 12 percent in 1967.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 21, Apr 1967, p10
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