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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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21 results for "Cultural heritage"
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Record #:
28565
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The Cultural Resources Emergency Support Team (CREST), a division of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, helps with recovery of cultural heritage collections. Following Hurricane Matthew, CREST held workshops on properly cleaning and preserving personal documents, and developed a database of institutions affected by the hurricane.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p31, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36962
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The Mountain Heritage Center uses the past to understand the present and shape the future, celebrating cultural heritage, educates and entertains its audiences, and gives students experience in museum work. It engages the community in the study, preservation, and celebration of southern Appalachian cultural heritage and history.
Record #:
30655
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New African-American heritage trails are making history come alive by linking North Carolina places to historic contributions and pivotal events. Many of the trails pertain to African-American culture, art and music, or the underground railroad. This article provides descriptions of trails offered in Jacksonville, Halifax, New Bern, Wilmington, Winston-Salem, and Raleigh.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Apr 2014, p44-45, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
25492
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Bernie Herman is a UNC professor of American Studies and native of Virginia’s Eastern Shore. Herman has expanded food tourism in Northampton County, Virginia to include Chapel Hill by bringing oysters and sweet potatoes. Herman’s goal is to document food culture and to explore local identities, while sharing distinctive recipes.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p12-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
16749
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The skipjack ADA MAE, under restoration in New Bern by a team of volunteers, is one of the few remaining historical vessels on the East Coast. She will be used as an educational vessel for school students, helping them appreciate North Carolina's coastal heritage through hands-on shipboard experience.
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Record #:
30735
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Project NC ECHO (Exploring Cultural Heritage Online) was created to locate, survey and assist various special collections and cultural heritage institutions throughout North Carolina. This program encourages libraries to partner with non-library entities in the digitization of special collections, in order to make available online, exhibits, indexes, catalogs and finding aids.
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Record #:
31184
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The Appalachian Heritage Crafters, a cooperative in Cherokee County, North Carolina, began as a way to maintain the history of Appalachian crafts and as a means of economic support in tough times. The cooperative has built a strong presence for their art, and are working on spreading skill throughout communities.
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Record #:
28933
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The St. Joseph’s Historic Foundation, Inc. has launched the African American Cultural Tourism Website. A project funded by the North Carolina Arts Council, the site offers visitors information about fourteen of the state’s most prominent African American cultural organizations.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p10
Record #:
36347
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The author explains how the travel and tourism industry and various state arts and cultural agencies collaboratively preserve and document South Carolina’s traditions cultural properties through cultural tourism.
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Record #:
28928
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Bob Harrell and Beverly Patterson discuss how the land in eastern North Carolina is still crucial to our communities. Harrell aims to reconnect people with their culture or their agri-culture at the Albermarle Learning Center in Chowan County. Patterson leads a program called the Annenburg Rural Challenge to promote rural folk history and culture.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p2-3, por
Record #:
28922
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Wayne Martin, folk life director at the North Carolina Arts Council, explained how traditional arts are an integral part of the culture of North Carolina and can contribute to a wealth of opportunities in cultural tourism. If done well, heritage tourism spurs economic development and helps preserve cultural traditions at the same time.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Winter 1998, p3, por
Record #:
28917
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The North Carolina Arts Council is leading an economic development and cultural preservation initiative for western North Carolina. The Blue Ridge Heritage Trail will serve communities that want to highlight their own cultural heritage as an economic development strategy. By focusing on the region’s most compelling stories, communities can attract tourists to experience distinct traditions.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Fall 1997, p4, il, por
Record #:
30754
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The North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort, NC became a part of the NC Department of Cultural Resources on Aug 8, 1997. Tracing it’s origin to a collection created in 1898 for the International Fisheries Exposition, the museum was placed under the NC Department of Agriculture in 1959, and did not have a full time curator until 1975.
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Record #:
28864
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The State of North Carolina declared 1986 the Year of the Native American. The purpose is to educate citizens about their Indian heritage and the role Indians have played in the state’s history. Festivals, symposia, exhibits, concerts and commemorations will mark the entire year.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 2 Issue 3, May 1986, p3, il
Record #:
28853
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The people who settled in North Carolina brought with them their cultural values, beliefs, customs and arts. These early settlers were heterogeneous, often conflicting ethnic groups whose influence on the state’s history has been both profound and subtle.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985, p2-3, il