NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for The Researcher Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
34749
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort’s first African-American school, the Washburn seminary, was founded in 1867 by the American Missionary Association and the northern Congregation Church. Located in a traditionally black neighborhood, the school’s aim was to train and educate freed slaves living in a refugee camp in Beaufort. Teachers were brought from northern states as educators, and by 1900 the school had expanded to include several new buildings including a training workshop and classrooms. In 1920, the main school building burned and was rebuilt near the new Beaufort High School which catered to the black community. Today, this building remains in use as the Beaufort Central School.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p5-6
Record #:
34752
Author(s):
Abstract:
Written in 1921, this article describes Cape Lookout at the “lonesomest” place in the world. Prior to the First World War, Cape Lookout was a bustling harbor undergoing improvements. With the war effort, however, construction of a breakwater stopped and many residents returned to Harker’s Island on the Core sound. Returning to the community, the author notes that many of the fishermen have abandoned the Cape Lookout fish stock because of its poor value. As one of the most dangerous shoals, the Cape Lookout Coast Guard station is outfitted with radio service. The guardsmen had rescued 30 vessels between 1911 and 1921.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p9-10, il
Record #:
34748
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sugarloaf Island sits across the water from Morehead City’s waterfront. First deeded to a local citizen in 1818, many residents in Morehead City today remember playing on the island as children. Fishermen used the small island to dry nets while the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers used the area to dump dredge spoil. In 2002, the town purchased the island as a city park and installed a foot path, boat dock, and rest rooms to increase accessibility and ease of use. Various species have been identified on the island and are recorded in an interpretive trail map.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p3-4, il
Record #:
34750
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article contains excerpts from a letter written in 1810 describing the town of Beaufort. Beaufort, a town in Carteret County, lies within sight of Topsail Inlet and the Atlantic Ocean. Fort Hampton, located on the southern side of the inlet, forms a familiar landmark for the 580 inhabitants. The primary industries are shipbuilding and fishing; whaling and porpoise fishing are the most lucrative commercial ventures, however, the mullet fishermen consistently yield good returns. While a maritime community, there are various other agricultural products produced by citizens including beef and sheep.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p7-8
Record #:
34751
Author(s):
Abstract:
The island of Portsmouth, located 25 miles from mainland North Carolina, was valued for raising livestock. During the early 19th century, sheep, horses, cattle, and goats were reared by the small community. Storm activity in the early 1800s threatened the livestock on the island as it destroyed much of their grazing areas. Apart from these animals, the island served little agricultural purpose as only sweet potatoes were well adapted to the salty soil.
Source:
Record #:
34755
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Second World War, government contracts and employment greatly increased the standard of living in the communities of Sea Level, Atlantic, and Cherry Point. As household goods and staples were rationed, some families decided to invest in real estate, moving to Pine Ridge. The author recalls one man, Mr. Denard, deciding to move his entire house to the burgeoning community. Using heavy cables, the house was lifted onto rollers and carted off.
Source:
Record #:
34754
Author(s):
Abstract:
Community stores were a tradition in 20th century Carteret County. Carrying everything from food stuffs to household items, every store kept personalized accounts for each family. The author recalls each of the nine stores selling specialty items—one is remembered as carrying fresh farm produce, for example, while another sold handmade Moon Pies. Kib’s Store, in particular, was memorable due to it’s shotgun architectural style and distinctive lean.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p12-13, il
Record #:
34753
Author(s):
Abstract:
In April 1864, Confederate forces attached the Cape Lookout Lighthouse. The subsequent reports stated both lighthouses at Cape Lookout were destroyed “so they can never be repaired again.” This, in fact, was not the case. The older 1812 lighthouse had been damaged but was not in use during the time of the attack. The newer lighthouse, built 1859, had only suffered damage to the lens and stairs. Within a short time, the 1859 light was returned to working order.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p11, il