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5 results for The North Carolina Booklet Vol. 23 Issue 1,2,3,4, January 1926
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Record #:
22563
Abstract:
During the reign of King William the Third, expenses incurred in the passage to America could be partially paid for every Church of England missionary or school-master who would undertake the journey. One such missionary was Reverend Thomas Burges, who made his way, via Virginia, to North Carolina in 1760. Burges settled in the Edgecomb Parish, Halifax County, North Carolina, where he taught school as well as worked in the ministry until his death in 1779. His eldest son from his first marriage, Henry John Burges, born in 1744, followed his father's example and became ordained in England in 1768. Leaving North Carolina for Virginia in 1770, Burges became a well-known supporter of the American Revolution while continuing to preach.
Record #:
22561
Abstract:
An iron marker now sits at the site of the Confederate Navy Yard in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Navy Yard operated from spring of 1862 until 1865. Commanded by first by General R.L. Page and later by H. Ashton Ramsay, a number of large structures were erected on site, including a gun carriage shop, a laboratory, a torpedo shop, a forge where propeller shafting was forged for all the Confederate ironclads. Rifles, shot, shells, and torpedoes were also manufactured at the Navy Yard in Charlotte.
Record #:
22562
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although few early written accounts of Indians in the Piedmont region of North Carolina exist, there are traces of the native populations that have been left behind. The Saponi, Tutelo, and especially the Catawba were strong tribes in the Piedmont region, as seen through relics and remains such as stone implements, pottery, arrows, and even graves.
Record #:
22560
Author(s):
Abstract:
The turning point in the struggle of American independence came in the winter of 1777-1778. Clothing, food, and munitions supplies were scant and the British fleet and army held Philadelphia, New York, and the Hudson River. North Carolina had nine regiments in Washington's winter camp, and part of these men were assigned to harass the British outposts.
Record #:
22559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Under the roof of Mrs. Elizabeth King in Edenton, North Carolina, on October 25th, 1774, fifty-one patriotic ladies declared they would not drink English tea or wear anything manufactured in England until the taxes were repealed for the American colonies.