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9 results for Tar Heel Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981
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Record #:
29321
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once considered a poor man’s food, the peanut has become a scarce and precious commodity in North Carolina. Since December, supermarket shelves usually stocked with peanut butter have stood nearly bare. Some peanut snacks have vanished or doubled and tripled in price, and civic groups have begun looking for other foods to sell as fundraisers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p55-56
Record #:
29320
Abstract:
Peanut farmers in Virginia and North Carolina have experienced rough seasons of uncertain weather and uncertain prices. North Carolina is a top peanut-producing state, but its peanut harvest fell by about forty-percent in 1980. After last fall’s drought, farmers are also short on seeds and continue the struggle to stay in business.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p46-54, il, por
Record #:
29318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Squid, a seafood high in protein and considered a delicacy in other countries, is in abundant supply off the North Carolina coast four to five months of the year. North Americans tend to overlook the value of squid as seafood, but state programs are underway to acquaint the public with its taste.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p34-36, il
Record #:
29317
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joe Wright was part of the Wilmington Ten, a group of activists convicted of criminal charges stemming from racially charged demonstrations February 5-6, 1971 in Wilmington, North Carolina. With the case legally behind him, Wright reflected on the past nine years during a recent interview at his lawyer’s office in Washington D.C.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p28-31, por
Record #:
29319
Author(s):
Abstract:
Each summer, thousands of Tar Heel children converge on North Carolina’s one-hundred-plus camps for a hands-on experience with nature. A directory of North Carolina camps has information compiled by geographic areas. It also includes articles on camping and a guide for parents.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p38-42, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29315
Author(s):
Abstract:
Doug Marlette, a political cartoonist for The Charlotte Observer, will be working on a strip and editorial cartoon called Kudzu. Kudzu is a caricature of the South, representing a dogged, determined innocent whose dreams of love and glory keep ramming into reality.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p16-21, il, por
Record #:
29316
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, a wide range of festivals take place to celebrate seasons, agricultural cycles, and traditions that enrich our lives. Spring starts off by celebrating specific kinds of fish, leading into seafood festivals held throughout the summer. This is a guide to some of those upcoming festivals, beginning with the Shad Festival in Grifton.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p23-26, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
29322
Author(s):
Abstract:
Images of mountain living in western North Carolina were depicted in Margaret Morley’s 1913 book, The Carolina Mountains. The image Morley conveyed to her readers was of a vanishing Golden Age in the Southern Appalachians. She wrote about the distinct folk life of the mountaineers, and how they may be the last link between the present and the past.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p58-61, por
Record #:
35919
Author(s):
Abstract:
April was known for two Durham County anniversaries, one being the 116th anniversary of General Joseph Johnston’s surrender to General William Sherman. The latter event appears to have generated only loss, but the author proved otherwise. Noted was Union soldiers camping near Bennett Place planted a seed of demand for its bright leaf tobacco. Wealth generated from the demand yielded the relocation of Trinity College to Durham. From an endowment by James B. Duke came the transformation of Trinity College into Duke University.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p64