NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


12 results for Folk life
Currently viewing results 1 - 12
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
18952
Author(s):
Abstract:
Videographer Neal Hutcheson has produced an extensive collection of documentaries on North Carolina's notable folk artists, folk speech of North Carolina cultural groups, and the family and community contexts of regional folk life.
Full Text:
Record #:
24501
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2015, UNC Chapel Hill’s Southern Oral History Program (SOHP) celebrated its fortieth anniversary. This article includes an interview with SOHP Director, Malinda Maynor Lowery, who discusses the current projects SOHP is working on and the ways in which the program strives to include Digital Humanities in its work.
Record #:
24866
Author(s):
Abstract:
A conversation between Sol Weiner and Steve Weiss, the curator of the Southern Folklife Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill, is conducted. They discuss what’s in the collection, how it’s made available to the public, why scholars study this collection, what projects are currently being worked on, how the collection has changed, and what the 25th anniversary celebration will consist of.
Record #:
28855
Abstract:
Folk life and folk art, such as quilting and bluegrass music, are traditions that have been passed down through time. In our culturally diverse North Carolina communities, folk life continues to evolve, integrating past forms, techniques and values with the present.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985, p4-5, il
Record #:
28898
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Menhaden Chanteymen are a musical group in Beaufort, North Carolina. They are a group of retired African American fishermen who perform the work songs they used when fishing for menhaden. Michael Luster documented the group and coastal folk life for the North Carolina Arts Council.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Spring 1990, p1-3, il
Record #:
28909
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Arts Council’s Folk Heritage Award acknowledges the importance of traditional culture by honoring individuals who grew up within deep family traditions. This year the award was given to six members of one family, the Watsons of Deep Gap in Watauga County. Through their artistry and range of creative gifts, the Watsons have brought national and international attention to North Carolina’s traditional culture.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Summer/Fall 1994, p5, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
28928
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bob Harrell and Beverly Patterson discuss how the land in eastern North Carolina is still crucial to our communities. Harrell aims to reconnect people with their culture or their agri-culture at the Albermarle Learning Center in Chowan County. Patterson leads a program called the Annenburg Rural Challenge to promote rural folk history and culture.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p2-3, por
Record #:
29322
Author(s):
Abstract:
Images of mountain living in western North Carolina were depicted in Margaret Morley’s 1913 book, The Carolina Mountains. The image Morley conveyed to her readers was of a vanishing Golden Age in the Southern Appalachians. She wrote about the distinct folk life of the mountaineers, and how they may be the last link between the present and the past.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p58-61, por
Record #:
31607
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources has established an Office of Folklife Programs to revive an interest in our rich cultural heritage. A statewide Folklife Festival is being organized for June 1978, and will feature folk music, dancing, storytelling, food and craftsmanship. A program is also being developed to introduce public school students to traditional folk music through performances and discussions.
Source:
Record #:
37022
Author(s):
Abstract:
Peterson is the director of the NCAC’s Folklife Program, overseeing grant programs, folklife projects, and traditional arts programming across the state.
Record #:
36499
Author(s):
Abstract:
Through an analysis of the ways South Georgia turpentiners use the past and tradition to actively express feelings in the present, the author demonstrates how rhetoric is employed in folk expression to both combat exoteric forces and express variable interpretations of the past and reveal in-group factionalism with concern to memory.
Subject(s):