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10 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006
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Record #:
7921
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's early immigrants were a mixed group that included well-to-do planters, laborers, artisans, apprentices, indentured servants, and convicts. In 1701, John Lawson first sighted the land where Bath would be built. Word of this desirable area quickly spread, attracting new immigrants from other colonies to move to North Carolina. In 1704, Lawson drew plans for the town, and in 1705, Bath incorporated. The surrounding area was a source of tar, turpentine, and other naval stores. Latham discusses the town's history.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p3-5, il, map
Record #:
7922
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beach recounts Highland Scots immigration to North Carolina and how they dealt with the differences they encountered. The first organized immigration came in 1739, when 350 people from Scotland sailed to Wilmington and latter settled in what would become Cumberland County. New arrivals priorities included selecting land, surveying it, and planting crops. By the late 18th-century, the largest population of Scots outside Scotland lived in the state.
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Record #:
7958
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the country occurred at John Reed's farm in Cabarrus County, twenty miles east of Charlotte. As the news spread, gold seekers of many nationalities poured in to seek their fortunes. The first mining that was conducted was called \"placer\" mining, or mining that is done aboveground. In 1825, Matthias Barringer discovered that gold could be found in veins of white quartz. By following the veins deep into the ground more gold could be recovered. Many of the miners left the state when gold was discovered in other Southern states and in California in 1849.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p20-21, il, map
Record #:
7961
Abstract:
In the 1880s southern politicians began turning against newly freed African Americans and passed many restrictive laws against them. African Americans in North Carolina faced a dilemma--stay and face discrimination or move to an unknown life somewhere else. Many chose to go North. Between 1900 and 1940, over two million African Americans left the South. North and South Carolina and Virginia topped the list of immigrants. The McKinleys discuss the life they made for themselves in the North. Since the 1970s, many have been returning, and North Carolina has been one of the most popular states to come back to.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p28-30, il, por
Record #:
7960
Author(s):
Abstract:
Neal summarizes the advances in transportation in the state. Early settlers arrived after an Atlantic voyage of seventy-five days. Wagons and boats took them farther inland, and later a road system developed. This was followed by the railroads and major highways and finally the airplane. Traveling on the Great Wagon Road from Pennsylvania to Salisbury in Rowan County took 24 days in the 1790s, then 13 hours by rail in the 1940s, 7 hours by car in the Interstate in the 1970s, and finally 4 by plane today.
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Record #:
7965
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's population is rapidly increasing. Between 2000 and 2005, the state had the ninth highest growth rate in the country, bringing the population to over eight-and-a-half million. A major factor in the increase was net migration, or the difference between how many people moved into and out of the state, which accounted for two-thirds of the overall population increase. The population is expected to reach twelve million by 2030, making North Carolina the nation's tenth largest state. Other changes are a more ethnically diverse population and a more urban one.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p34-36, il, map
Record #:
7956
Abstract:
Hendricks describes the settlement of the Piedmont region, or the backcountry of the state, during the 1700s. The first European settlers in the area were English. Many came down the Great Wagon Road or moved from the Coastal Plain. Population grew in the state from 35,000 in 1730 to 180,000 in 1770; much of the growth took place in the Piedmont. New towns were created to serve as government and trade centers or cultural centers for groups, such as German Moravians, and new counties formed.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p12-14, il, map
Record #:
7955
Abstract:
This road is known by several names. In North Carolina it is called the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road, or just Great Wagon Road. In Virginia it is called the Carolina Road because it led down into North Carolina. This road from Pennsylvania to the backcountry of North Carolina followed early Indian trails. It brought settlers for a number of reasons: fertile land at good prices, new opportunities, and religious freedom. The authors describe a trip on the road and some of the groups that traveled it.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p8-11, il, map
Record #:
7957
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state adopted its first slave code in 1715. This document defined the social, economic, and physical places of enslaved people. Most of the slaves purchased in the colony came from Virginia and South Carolina, and most lived on large plantations in the eastern section. The largest plantation was Stagville, established in 1787, and located in parts of what is now Orange and three other counties. More than 900 slaves worked on the 30,000-acre plantation.
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Record #:
7959
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1893, French-speaking Protestants known as Waldenses settled in Valdese, located in Burke County. The group was persecuted for its religion in Europe from 1184 until 1848, until King Charles Albert, King of Sardinia, and Duke of Savoy, granted the Waldenses full civil liberties and freedom of conscience. Valdese began with 300 settlers and still thrives today with over 4,600 residents.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p22-24, il, por