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3 results for Great Philadelphia Wagon Road
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Record #:
9822
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Philadelphia Wagon Road, which cut diagonally through North Carolina's Piedmont, was the primary southbound route for English, Scotch-Irish, and Germanic immigrants who began arriving in Pennsylvania in the 1720s. By 1760, it had become the most heavily traveled road in America, fostering the establishment of new towns throughout the south, including Salisbury, Charlotte, and the Moravian settlements of Bethania and Salem in North Carolina. Revolutionary War battles fought along the Wagon Road include Camden, Cowpens, King's Mountain, and Guilford Courthouse.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 1, June 1972, p6-8, il, map
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Record #:
23053
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article describes historic methods of travel and highlights three important trails in North Carolina history, including The Great Wagon Road, the Trail of Tears, and The Underground Railroad.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 2, Spring 2015, p6-7, il, por, map
Record #:
7955
Abstract:
This road is known by several names. In North Carolina it is called the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road, or just Great Wagon Road. In Virginia it is called the Carolina Road because it led down into North Carolina. This road from Pennsylvania to the backcountry of North Carolina followed early Indian trails. It brought settlers for a number of reasons: fertile land at good prices, new opportunities, and religious freedom. The authors describe a trip on the road and some of the groups that traveled it.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p8-11, il, map