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15 results for Our State Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017
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Record #:
34952
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In 1965, Duke University piloted the first physician assistant (PA) program as a way to integrate military personnel with medical knowledge into a civilian job. Since then, PA programs have spread throughout the world and over 100,000 assistants have been certified in the U.S. This program also introduced a collaborative method to approaching medicine and expanded aid to underserved communities.
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34955
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The Lake Lure Inn was built in 1927 after the river nearby was dammed, creating a lake in the Hickory Nut Gorge. Famous writers and actors, presidents, and WWII soldiers have all graced the halls of this enormous 90-year old hotel, creating a long-lasting legacy of comfort. It remains a time capsule of the 1920’s and 1930’s.
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34953
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Highland Avenue Restaurant in Hickory, North Carolina has become a pivotal part of the community. By incorporating fresh ingredients from farms within a 50-mile radius, the farm-to-table approach has stimulated the economy of the area and introduced a different dining experience than the area’s chain restaurants.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p46-50, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34957
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The Crossnore School & Children’s Home, built in 1917, has become famous for its weaving room, created in 1920. The weavers are experts in handloom weaving, using a large loom with materials such as linen, wool, pearl cotton, alpaca, and more.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p78-82, il, por Periodical Website
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34954
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Pender County, North Carolina hosts a small vineyard called Bannerman Vineyard and Winery. A small operation of 18-acres, the winery creates only muscadine wines and juices, but still have created a loyal following of fans, some as far away as Maryland and Ohio.
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34958
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In this photo essay, the most iconic part of Fall is photographed: the pumpkin. All over North Carolina, pumpkin patches, carving competitions, weigh-ins, and pies pop up to help celebrate Halloween and Thanksgiving.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p84-103, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34956
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Photographer Tim Barnwell has published two new books, “Great Smoky Mountains Vistas” and “Blue Ridge Parkway Vistas”. The goal of these books was to photograph and identify the mountain peaks that can be viewed from outlooks across North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p64-65, il, por Periodical Website
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34960
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The first forestry plan in the United States was created for Biltmore Estates by Gifford Pinchot. This would change how the country viewed forest conservation, making it both profitable and practical. Pinchot’s successor, Dr. Carl Schenck, created a forestry school to teach the new generation of forester management skills and techniques. Together, these two men created took European models and tailoring to the American landscape.
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34961
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John Simcox Holmes was the first forester in North Carolina, and for a long time, the only forester in the state. By conducting interviews and surveys all along the state, Holmes was able to take charge in 1915 and slow the destruction of the forests. His long list of successes includes establishing a fire warden budget, protecting Mount Mitchell as a state park, establishing nurseries to grow replacement trees for deforested areas, and writing “Common Forest Trees of North Carolina, How to Know Them”, which is still in use today.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p144-150, il, por Periodical Website
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34959
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North Carolina is known as the birth place of American forestry. Pioneers in the field such as Gifford Pinchot and Dr. Carl Schenk began their work in North Carolina, and created tactics such as prescribed burns, selective thinning, and management plans. This has ensured a profitable logging industry while keeping forests sustainable and healthy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p120-134, il, por, map Periodical Website
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34962
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Before modern technology, the only way to detect a wildfire was to watch from a tower. Many of these forestry towers, though not in use, are still standing and have become an integral part of Western North Carolina hiking trails. Fryingpan Mountain Lookout Tower, located near Pisgah National Forest, is the tallest in the Western half of the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p152-160, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34963
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The American Chestnut tree once grew all up and down the east coast, until a blight nearly wiped out the species. Today, the Green Park Inn of Blowing Rock stands as a testament to that time, restoring their chestnut wood handicrafts, serving food on chestnut planks, and naming their restaurant the Chestnut Grille.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p162-168, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36973
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This Native American mound, in existence since 800AD, currently serves as the sole state historic site dedicated to the heritage of North Carolina’s first natives. With formal excavations starting in the late 1930s, the village also contains one of the longest studied archaeological sites in the United States.
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36975
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In the age of GPS devices, some tools introduced in the late 19th century are still tools of the trade for the lumbering industry around the world. Profiled and pictured are Caulk Boots, with spiked soles for traction and slippery surfaces; Pulaski Tool, with an ax on one side for chopping, a mattox on the other side for digging; and Biltmore Stick, used for calculating trees’ volume.
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37162
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This Native American mound, in existence since 800AD, currently serves as the sole state historic site dedicated to the heritage of North Carolina’s first natives. With formal excavations starting in the late 1930s, the village also contains one of the longest studied archaeological sites in the United States.