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14 results for Our State Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011
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Record #:
14977
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Scott Huler is the 2011 Piedmont Laureate. Local art councils created the program to promote awareness and appreciation of the arts in the Piedmont. Moose examines his writing interests which are wide-ranging.
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14978
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Mount Gilead, located in Montgomery County, is Our State Magazine's featured Tar Heel Town of the Month.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p28-34, 36, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15003
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Brickmaking in North Carolina dates back to the late 1600s with the state's oldest brick house dating from 1730. Currently the state ranks second behind Texas in brickmaking. There were thirty manufacturers in 1960, but automation, acquisitions, and the recent recession shrank that number to thirteen. Of that number seven are family-owned businesses. The Statesville Brick Company, founded in 1904, is the state's oldest family-owned company.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p38-40, 42, 44-45, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15004
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As a boy growing up in Sugar Grove in Watauga County, Robert Dotson learned flatfoot dancing. Now at 88, he is considered one of the North Carolina's finest flatfoot dancers, an art form that is smooth and light requiring the dancer's feet to stay close to the ground.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p48-50, 52-54, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15011
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Wilmington native Willis Richardson, playwright, director, and federal government worker, was a pioneer in the black theater movement and Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Shortly before his death in 1977, a group of African American actors in Wilmington formed the Willis Richardson Players in honor of the playwright. The group performs several works each season that are of interest to all audiences. Performances take place at the Thalian Hall Center for Performing Arts.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p156-158, 160, 162, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15012
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Jeff Miller and his wife Missy operate Luella's Bar-B-Que located in Asheville. The restaurant opened in 2007, and Luella's top seller continues to be the pork barbecue sandwich with slaw and a side of macaroni and cheese.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p170-174, 176, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15013
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The South is known for its cooking. Summerville discusses four books of recipes that will delight and fill up readers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p178-160, 182, 184, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15039
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The Cupola House, built in Edenton in 1758, is one of the state's most historic buildings. The gardens that surround the house follow the design laid out in a detailed 1769 map, and they are maintained by a group of volunteer Edenton citizens.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p188-190, 192, 194, 196, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15678
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Part five of Gerard's eight-part series on the Civil War is about William Henry Asbury Speer of Yadkin represents the conflicted Confederate soldier; hesitant to fight but determined to defend his state. He was appointed captain of Company I, 28th Regiment of North Carolina Troops. During the course of the war he would be captured and transported to several northern prisoner of war camps, returned to service, and placed in charge of troops in almost every major engagement. He perished at the Battle of Reams' Station near Petersburg, Virginia in 1864.
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Record #:
38299
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The oyster has played an important role in the development of Eastern North Carolina and its people over the centuries. Nonprofits like the North Carolina Coastal Federation seek to undo the damage done to this vital bivalve by overharvesting and pollution, which have decreased its population by 50% since the nineteenth century.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p116-120, 122, 124-128 Periodical Website
Record #:
38298
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Called sound country by the author, North Carolina attained this status by having more sounds than any other state in the east. Its importance may be better defined, however, by the role that sounds like Currituck have played in defining a way of life for Eastern North Carolinians and the region’s seafood industry for centuries.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p96-98, 100, 102-104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114 Periodical Website
Record #:
38297
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On Bob Timberlake’s personal landscape is a barn that survived Union soldiers’ invasion, in addition to his guest house and studio. Along with his artistic endeavors, Timberlake produces furniture, made only by companies in North Carolina and part of a line Timberlake touted as the most famous in history.
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Record #:
38300
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The stories of three Eastern North Carolinians help explains how Eastern North Carolinians endure challenges threatening a way of life sustaining them for four centuries. In recounting the lives of individuals from Atlantic, Frisco, and Beaufort, Garrity-Blake also explains her enduring passion for helping to preserve this way of life. Also attesting this passion are activities like her compilation of oral histories for the National Park Service’s study of Outer Banks villages and co-authoring Fish House Opera.
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Record #:
38301
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Visitations to sound towns like Belhaven, Harkers Island, and Elizabeth City help Nickens illustrate the endurance of the region’s people and why Eastern North Carolina endures in capturing his fancy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p142-144, 146-148, 150, 152, 154 Periodical Website