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8 results for Cookery, American--Southern style
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Record #:
8854
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In this ongoing series about favorite Southern foods, Garner looks into the kitchen and discovers chicken dumplings. He includes several recipes on how to prepare this dish and lists three eating establishments that serve them, including Old School Mill's Fresh House (Locust); Stephenson's Bar-B-Cue (Willow Springs); and Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q (Durham).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p36-38, 40, 42, 44-48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15013
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The South is known for its cooking. Summerville discusses four books of recipes that will delight and fill up readers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p178-160, 182, 184, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23060
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Chef Sean Brock discusses the work of the Southern Foodways Alliance and the return of original Southern food--that based in vegetables and grains, not cream and butter--to the South.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 21, May 2015, p13, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23102
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In the digital age, food has become the cultural currency of America. From farmers markets to simply sitting around the table, food is the center of cultural transfer and conversation in a world increasingly relying on computers and the internet. Southern food in particular represents comfort to those within and outside of the region.
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Record #:
24601
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Wilbur King Sr. started Kings Restaurant in Kinston in 1936. The restaurant was originally part of a country store and filling station, but has since gained its own space and opened three branches. The restaurant serves eastern style barbecue, but is most known for the Pig in a Puppy sandwich—barbecue served in a hush puppy bun.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p65-66, 68-69, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24756
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Collards are a popular southern dish and have risen in popularity more recently. Kinston chef Vivian Howard and North Carolina farmers Lloyd Lewis, Howard McAdams, and Louis Nixon discuss their cooking and farming experience with collards in North Carolina.
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North Carolina Field and Family (NoCar S 1 N672), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Winter 2015, p6-9, il, por, map
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Record #:
27444
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The Ceja Bautista family is distributing bowls of pozole stew at a mobile home park in Durham to celebrate Saint Francis of Assisi. The stew is rooted in spiritual traditions and Mexican celebrations that express gratitude with generosity.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 40, Oct 2016, p14-16, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31520
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Traditional Southern breakfasts featured grits, homemade biscuits, country ham or sausage, red eye gravy, and eggs. This tradition, which appears to be fading, is now reserved for special occasions or holidays. Dr. Thomas K. Fitzgerald, a nutritional anthropologist at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, discusses the history and evolution of Southern food culture.
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