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13 results for Endeavors Vol. 25 Issue 3, Spring 2009
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Record #:
25787
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As part of the 2009 Carolina Summer Reading Program, first-year students are reading Paul Cuadros’ new book called, A Home on the Field. It is the first book the selection committee has chosen that was written by a UNC faculty member. It is also a true story that the committee thinks will spark discussion about immigration in North Carolina.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Spring 2009, p34-36, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25788
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Bird flu is a danger wherever people mingle with birds, especially in crowded, unsanitary conditions. For years, the H5N1 bird flu has been considered an imminent threat to public health because it can transfer from birds to humans. UNC researcher Ray Pickles is trying to find what can prevent the bird flu from becoming a pandemic.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Spring 2009, p37-39, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25789
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Treating certain kinds of life-threatening cancer is difficult because oncologists do not know all the genetic abnormalities that underpin the disease. UNC scientists are now part of a nationwide effort to understand all the genetic changes that occur in cancer, and are currently focusing on brain tumors.
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Record #:
25781
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Biologist Peter White codirects the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (ATBI), an ongoing project dedicated to preserving the Great Smoky Mountains National Park ecosystem. The ATBI has discovered over six thousand species new species in the park and aims to document every living species in the park.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Spring 2009, p5-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25785
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Kenneth Lohmann and his colleagues have a new theory about how sea turtles and salmon routinely migrate back to their birthplaces. They suggest that animals at birth may read and store the Earth’s magnetic signature in their memory to help them migrate home.
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Record #:
25786
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Zena Cardman is an undergraduate biology student who conducted research in British Columbia and the Canadian Arctic during the summer of 2008. Cardman and astrobiologists studied bacteria in frozen soils to learn about the potential for life on Mars.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Spring 2009, p28-33, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25782
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Scientists commonly use fruit flies to study how human bodies work. At UNC, biologists are using them to study genes involved in DNA repair pathways, scent perceptions, food preferences, and human health.
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Record #:
25783
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Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are microscopic species with unusual survival capabilities. Bob Goldstein uses tardigrades to study evolution because of their unique development and reproduction capabilities.
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Record #:
25784
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Researchers are studying frog communication to understand how human nervous systems have evolved. This is a growing field of science called neuroethology, a combination of neurobiology and ethology.
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Record #:
25790
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Yekta Zülfikar, a sophomore majoring in international studies, took part in the Burch Field Seminar in Turkey to study why coups occur and how they impact people’s lives. Yekta believes that Turkey is heading in direction that should help stop coup attempts.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Spring 2009, p43-45, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34994
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Through botanical endeavors such as the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (ATBI), thousands of plants have been discovered in places such as the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. However, one such plant’s sole “discovery” being debated prompted an ecologist to ask: was Albert Ruth the only person to find twinflower in Tennessee? Peter White resolved to settle the debate by retracing Ruth’s steps in that 1892 journey.
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Record #:
35761
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On Axel Heiberg Island, adventure was found for the author in ways that went beyond being part of a team collecting samples for astrobiological research. It was found in adjusting to the absence of modern conveniences easily taken for granted, such as comfortable indoor plumbing. It was also found in realizing that “habitable” becomes redefined by habituating in the North Pole.
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Record #:
35757
Author(s):
Abstract:
On Axel Heiberg Island, adventure was found for the author in ways that went beyond being part of a team collecting samples for astrobiological research. It was found in adjusting to the absence of modern conveniences easily taken for granted, such as comfortable indoor plumbing. It was also found in realizing that “habitable” becomes redefined by habituating in the North Pole.
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