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34 results for "Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society"
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Record #:
1396
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This Beaufort County study reveals that bobcats vary their diets seasonally, primarily eating rabbits in the summer and fall and cotton rats in the winter and spring.
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1395
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Wright shows that, by using existing technology, Elisha Mitchell could have accurately measured the height of the Black Mountains without exposing himself to the risks that killed him in 1857.
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1398
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Brown provides a list of thirty amphibians and forty-five reptiles observed in North Carolina's western Piedmont region, with notes on size, numbers, and habitat.
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Record #:
1397
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The capture of a specimen of Octopus macropus off Cape Lookout, the second specimen collected off the North Carolina coast, leads the author to propose that the species range of O. macropus be increased to include this region.
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Record #:
1495
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This study of the chemical weathering of the limestone outcropping on the north shore of Lake Waccamaw indicates that the process plays an important role in neutralizing the relatively acidic source waters and maintaining the lake's high alkalinity.
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Record #:
1496
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Elevated levels of arsenic and lead were found downstream from a large textile plant. No apparent surface water pollution of heavy metals from either the city's wastewater treatment plant or landfill was found.
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1497
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Using three marina collection sites and three open water collection sites, Byers provides evidence that significant zinc and copper bioaccumulation is occurring in certain marine invertebrates in marinas.
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Record #:
2412
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Statewide, tornadoes are becoming stronger and more numerous, inflicting property destruction, injuries, and death. Between 1963 and 1992, the state averaged 15.3 tornadoes yearly, and in 1991 was ranked 22nd nationally in number of tornadoes.
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2903
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Sixty-six species of mammals inhabit the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Since the data were collected in 1968, two new ones, the hoary bat and the coyote, have been recorded, and two others, the river otter and the red wolf, have been reintroduced.
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Record #:
2949
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On July 20, 1995, an adult male reef shark was caught approximately one kilometer east of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. The capture afforded the first documented data for this type of shark and indicated a range extension north of Florida waters.
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Record #:
3037
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Larry Alston Whitford, who died October 6, 1995, exemplifies the spirit of the land-grant college--to educate the common man. From humble rural beginnings, he was graduated from NC State University and became a world-renowned psychologist.
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3056
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Dr. Donald Benton Anderson, an outstanding teacher, scientist, researcher in biology, and administrator at North Carolina State University, died May 22, 1994. Among his many honors was the 1951 O. Max Gardner Award.
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Record #:
3628
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Cooperation between the New Zealand government and the pork industry resulted in more effective swine waste management practices. Consideration of such practices could provide ways to improve hog waste management in the state.
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Record #:
3928
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The coyote's range is expanding. In the early 1980s, the animal was found in only four of the state's one hundred counties. By 1998, it had almost covered the state. Impacts from such proliferation include increased human-animal encounters and threats to native wildlife.
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Record #:
3929
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From 1982 to 1996, the Poor Boy Shark Tournament was held at Shallotte Point. These tournaments were popular because sharks were plentiful, good sport, and good to eat. However, two things ended the tournament in 1996. First, because sharks were being overfished, there were plans to limit size and catch; and secondly, other fishing tournaments began to offer larger money prizes.
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