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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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111 results for "Carolina Gardener"
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Record #:
17409
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Westerfield states that \"it is difficult to cover all the types of fruit and all of the techniques in one short article.\" He lists common pitfalls and offers tips that are general to all fruits in a home garden.
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34824
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Asheville resident Peter Loewer keeps a garden fit for western North Carolina’s cool climate. During the summer of 2016, however, the area was hit with high temperatures and little rainfall. Following the season, Loewer assessed his garden and others in the area to determine which plants had high levels of heat resilience. He found that several grasses faired well, as did his tropical annuals. Plants intended to attract insect life, too, survived the summer heat.
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Record #:
17463
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Farmer says that a drought-tolerant garden is easy to do--just pick the right plants and plant them properly. Among the plants he suggests are crinum, dyckia, liriope, windmill palms, Cooper Canyon daisy, and four o'clocks.
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Record #:
34820
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The Legacy Demonstration Garden, located in Greensboro, North Carolina, was created by Master Gardeners to educate, demonstrate, and inspire locals through small scale landscaping and gardening. The group of 170 plus volunteers meets regularly and hosts events throughout the year to get community members involved.
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Record #:
34802
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The Inn at Ragged Garden, a 20th century bed-and-breakfast, has one of the longest garden displays in Blowing Rock, North Carolina. From spring into late fall, a full acre of land is devoted to gardens that include oriental lilies, dahlias, petunias, and more.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 1, February 2017, p56-61, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36198
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A lot of renovation work was invested in the transformation of a parking lot into a city park. Including elements such as a clock, type of tree imported from Italy, and Spartanburg County medallion map made the ten year venture a labor of love.
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Record #:
21848
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Anderson describes how to add silver to the garden using plants, including Jack Frost, White Nancy, Margery Fish, and White Dusty Miller.
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Record #:
17370
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Edwin Gonzalez has a garden different from most gardeners. His is located on the rooftop of the 14-story Battery Park apartment building which was built in 1924 in downtown Asheville. Gonzalez grew up in Puerto Rico and was involved in gardening on the family farm. He received over $300 in plant aid from Project EMMA--Eat better, Move More, Age well--an organization that seeks to increase wellness and health opportunities for participants in the Council on Aging of Buncombe County.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 24 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p50-54, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
21863
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There are about 175 species of butterflies in the state. The eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly is perhaps the most recognizable with its yellow body with black stripes and a wingspan between three and six inches. In 2011 Frances Parnell and the Cape Fear Garden Club, Inc. of Wilmington began lobbying the NC General Assembly for a North Carolina Butterfly Symbol, and in June 2012 the eastern tiger swallowtail was so named.
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Record #:
23980
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Donna Edgell, a teacher in Mebane, North Carolina, discusses how she successfully ties teaching and gardening together on her property.
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Record #:
20667
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New pests and diseases are coming to the Carolinas. One is the brown marmorated stink bug, a native to Asia, which was introduced in the country in 1998. Two types of scale--the oak lecanium and the gloomy scale--attack oaks and red maples respectively. In June, 2013, the emerald ash borer was found in three state counties--Granville, Person, and Vance. This Asian beetle was first found in southeastern Michigan in 2002 and has since spread to eighteen states. Boxwood blight, found in the state in 2012, attacks American and English boxwoods.
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Record #:
34823
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Gary Pierce, a North Carolina resident, decided to begin beekeeping to help support local farms. In North Carolina, crop pollination is heavily reliant on individuals with small scale beekeeping (less than twenty five hives). As bees are important to the state, there are several beekeepers who are employed as hive inspectors. These individuals visit hives and aid in running diagnostic tests. Pierce had several issues with one hive which necessitated a visit from the inspector. While the visit was not successful, Pierce concludes that bees remain an important aspect of the North Carolina economy. All in all, he believes that beekeeping is worth the sting.
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Record #:
21184
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Gardeners in the Carolinas are fortunate to have a wide array of naturally occurring stone and rock, such as sandstone, limestone, granite, and slate. Some of these may be found on the gardener's property, while garden centers specialize in stones from small natural ones to large boulders. Ward gives examples of how stones can be another choice to enhance garden appearances.
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Record #:
36190
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Made in the shade is a type of garden that can thrive without sunlight. Plants recommended by the author to cultivate in shade filled areas were Lungwort, Solomon’s Seal, Hosta, and Maidenhead Fern.
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Record #:
23979
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Biochar is the result of heating biomass under the exclusion of air and provides richness to soils, is better for the air and climate, and helps plants grow and mature more successfully.
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