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29 results for Wineries
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Record #:
8019
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Wineries are growing in North Carolina. In 2001, fifteen or so were producing wines. By 2006, the number of wineries had grown to fifty-three. They range from the grandeur of Biltmore Estate to cottage operations like Hanover Park. A number of wineries like Shelton, RayLen, Childress, and Westbend, have put the state on the national wine scene with award-winning wines.
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Record #:
16775
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Ensrud, Metro Magazine's Wine Editor, discusses the wine scene in North Carolina, which is developing into a major wine region with top-flight products, vineyards, and a growing reputation.
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Record #:
9392
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Sold under the brand name “Deerfield Vineyards,” Edenton's Wine Cellars, Inc. once had the distinction of being North Carolina's only legal winery. The 83-acre vineyard grows the sweet scuppernong grapes that yield a light, dry table wine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p17-18, il
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Record #:
22041
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Spencer discusses the beer and wine industry in the state, as well as new emerging distilleries. The state has strict laws that liquor cannot flow as freely as beer and wine. The state also has a reputation for making illegal moonshine, but anyone with the right permits can distil liquor. Although Prohibition repeal was decades ago, the state's first legal distillery did not open till ten years ago. Now there are 14 distilleries in North Carolina, compared to 146 wineries and 82 breweries.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Feb 2014, p22, 24-25, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22487
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Chris Choinski's B&C Winery, a Waynesville wine-crafting business, began as a hobby and now not only sells handcrafted wines, but offers help to others interested in home brewing.
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Record #:
34954
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Pender County, North Carolina hosts a small vineyard called Bannerman Vineyard and Winery. A small operation of 18-acres, the winery creates only muscadine wines and juices, but still have created a loyal following of fans, some as far away as Maryland and Ohio.
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Record #:
24531
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Duplin Wine Cellars in Rose Hill, North Carolina produces a wine that is made entirely from the juice of grapes native to the state. This article presents the new winery and how they produce wine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 6, November 1977, p12-14, il
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Record #:
16715
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North Carolinians can be proud of the rapid progress of the fledgling wine industry of the state. The groundwork was laid some 30 years ago and has overcome major challenges with producing quality wines.
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Record #:
9391
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The scuppernong has been the favored for winemaking in the south since 1584 when a Roanoke colonists recorded the grapes' abundance. The grape is now going commercial from Chowan County, at Wine Cellars, Inc., North Carolina's only winery.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p17, il
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Record #:
35776
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Winemaking, starting during the 16th century, had become an important state and national industry by the 19th. Winemakers that contributed to its state and national prominence included Paul Garrett. In fact, by the early twentieth century, his five wineries were producing the best-selling brand in the America, “Virginia Dare.” As for modern day winemakers Stanley believed spurred this tradition’s comeback, they included Duplin Wine Cellars in Rose Hill.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p26-28
Record #:
6416
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North Carolina is home to over two dozen wineries, ranging from multi-million dollar operations to small mom-and-pop ones. Chase takes the reader on a tour of several, including RagApple Lassie Vineyards (Boonville); Westbend Vineyards (Lewisville); Windy Gap Vineyards (Ronda); and Chateau Laurinda (Sparta).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p76-78,80-81, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4472
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The state has a long history of winemaking and at one time was the nation's leader. Now with a Grape Council promoting the wine industry, the state seeks to make a name again as a wine producer. There are fourteen wineries in the state, but three - Biltmore Winery at Asheville, Westbend Vineyards in Lewisville, and Duplin Cellars in Rose Hill - produce 95 percent of the state's wine. Production doubled in the state during the 1990s, rising from 28,954 cases in 1988 to 66,426 cases n 1999.
Record #:
29657
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North Carolina is now one of the best places in the country to enjoy wine. As the wine industry has grown since 2000 with double the acres of grape vines and triple the wineries, wine tourism has also grown. An estimated 800,000 tourists come to North Carolina for the wine each year, with an economic impact of $813 million.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p52-53, por
Record #:
9412
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Williams explores the wine country of the northern crescent of the Yadkin River Valley, which stretches through the counties of Surry, Wilkes, and Yadkin. He describes a number of wineries and accommodations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 4, Sept 2007, p200-202, 204, 206-207, il Periodical Website
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