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28 results for Water--Pollution
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Record #:
11154
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has worked hard to keep its rivers clean. Earle C. Hubbard, director of the Division of Stream Sanitation and Hydrology talks about the cleanliness of local water. Hubbard noted that a majority of the streams are classified as pure or clean enough to require minimal chemical changes for everyday use. The abundant water resources in the 16 river basins of North Carolina require constant attention to prevent polluters from damaging the water.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 10, Oct 1966, p19, 25, por
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Record #:
9553
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a recent survey by the Tennessee Valley Authority, titled “Where the Water Isn't Clean Anymore,” three North Carolina Rivers have been named as problem areas--the Pigeon River, North Toe, and Nolichucky.
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Record #:
8654
Author(s):
Abstract:
The decline in water quality of the Pamlico River and Sound, the second largest estuary in the country, threatens fish populations and the livelihoods of many fishermen. Two major industries using the lands along the water system are agriculture and forestry. Both contribute to the estuary's problems. Taylor examines the sources of the pollution, both nonpoint and point, and what can be done to control them.
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Record #:
7881
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Abstract:
In 1996, the General Assembly created the N.C. Clean Water Management Trust Fund to deal with water pollution. The fund was the brainchild of State Senator Marc Basnight. The fund provides grants to groups for such projects as the restoration of degraded lands and building of riparian buffers. Not only has the fund protected water resources, it has facilitated significant increases in state game lands and other areas designated for outdoor recreation. One of the largest fund recipients has been the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, which has received almost $77 million for forty-nine projects statewide. The fund is helping the state reach its goal of preserving one million acres of additional open space (the One Million Acre Initiative) by the year 2009.
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Record #:
27519
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Abstract:
Experts say the Triangle’s drinking water is “probably” safe, but carcinogens have been detected in quantities slightly larger than considered safe. The area treatment systems are not equipped to handle this problem. Most of the area’s rivers, lakes, and reservoirs are considered unfit for swimming and drinking. The scope of the Triangle’s water pollution and solutions are examined in Part 1 of a three part series.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 9, April 27-May 3 1989, p9-10, 14-16, map Periodical Website
Record #:
27520
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Triangle area water supply has contaminants in it and some are appearing in quantities slightly larger than considered safe. Each city’s water supply is examined according to chemists at each city and their lab tests on file at the NC Division of Health Sciences. Durham, Raleigh, Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, and Pittsboro and their results are explained.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 9, April 27-May 3 1989, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27893
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC could overhaul or scrap the new wastewater treatment system at its Bingham Facility. The facility experienced several chemical leaks and discharges within the past year. Neighbors of the facility repeated told UNC their concerns about the facility’s environmental impact. The university may lose a federal grant and be fined by the state for the leaks. Neighbors are concerned about the quality of their water after leaks.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
29725
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilma Dykeman’s first book, The French Broad, was published seven years before Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. Dykeman’s book is widely credited for bringing needed attention to the polluted state of the French Broad River and its tributary, the Pigeon River. The Center for Cultural Preservation and the Wilma Dykeman Legacy will present a program honoring her work in Western North Carolina.
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Record #:
33297
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Board of Science and Technology funded the development of “Pollution Prevention Pays” projects to prevent the discharge of wastewater pollutants. Detailed case studies are provided for successful applications of pollution-prevention approaches by twenty-five North Carolina corporations and municipalities.
Record #:
33344
Author(s):
Abstract:
Water management plans being developed by the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission will be used to evaluate management plans of proposed peat mining operations in North Carolina. Concern over the environmental effects of peat mining relates to such impacts as increased freshwater runoff from the mining sites to saline fish nursery areas and increased pollution.
Record #:
33351
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many of today’s groundwater pollution problems result from improper waste disposal. This article discusses the issue in North Carolina and presents a new approach to site selection and construction of hazardous waste disposal sites.
Record #:
34295
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists believe that issues of limited water supply, sediment pollution, and excessive nitrogen are emerging as recurrent problems. The accepted nutrient application practices across the Coastal Plain may be contributing to unacceptably high nutrient concentrations throughout shallow aquifers. They advise plans to define sustainable rates of nutrient application to the land.
Record #:
34309
Author(s):
Abstract:
An apparent loophole in the North Carolina water quality standard for turbidity in surface waters allows exceedances of the numeric standard under certain conditions. Given that sediment is regarded by some to be the major surface water pollutant in North Carolina, the standards may need to be reconsidered.