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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for Naval stores
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Record #:
1963
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Life in the naval stores industry of 19th-century North Carolina is documented in a pictorial series.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p12-15, il
Record #:
3230
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John Averitt's Onslow County plantation, \"Rich Lands,\" was a leading naval stores producer 150 years ago. Although great wealth accrued to the family, uncontrolled harvesting destroyed the pines and led to the family's downfall in 1857.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1997, p21-24, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
9133
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Colonial Period, North Carolina accounted for three fifths of all naval stores shipped from the American colonies to England. Naval stores include tar, rosin, turpentine, and pitch. In 1705, England, no longer dependent on Sweden and the Baltic countries for stores, passed the Naval Stores Bounty Act, authorizing large payments for the goods from the colonies. Although the turpentine industry boomed in the 1840s and 50s, the Civil War was devastating to the industry which never fully recovered after the war.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p14-16, il
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Record #:
10871
Abstract:
When prices for tar and pitch were increased by their suppliers, England turned to their American colonies as a new source around 1700. Southeastern North Carolina became a major supplier of naval stores, which included tar, rosin, turpentine, and pitch. For decades Wilmington was recognized as the largest export point in the world for naval stores.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 15, Jan 1968, p12-13, 15, il
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Record #:
13888
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Abstract:
The name \"Turpentine State\" may be justified again if Vivian Whitfield of Pender County can restore the Naval Stores industry in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 1, June 1950, p8, 19, f
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Record #:
17733
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During the era of wooden ships trade of naval stores was indispensable but fell off with the development of non-wooden hull types. A resurgence in the demand for tar increased in the mid-19th-century because of evolving field of petrochemicals. Throughout both periods the industry thrived in the state because of the density of long-leaf pine trees, a major source of resin for tar.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p7-16, por
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Record #:
18638
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Port Brunswick along the Cape Fear River became a major exporter of pitch, tar, and raw turpentine. Robinson reviews the production of naval stores and the arrangement of port facilities through archaeological research.
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North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 46 Issue , Oct 1997, p51-68, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
21797
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This article looks at the factors that contributed to the demise of the naval stores industry in 19th century North Carolina. While economic and technological contributions played a significant role, attention is also given to the physiology and ecological dynamics of long leaf pine and southeastern Pine Barrens.
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Record #:
3340
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Aubrey Shaw was the seventh generation of his family to live on their land near Roseboro. His ancestors harvested the longleaf pine for naval stores. He was probably the last North Carolinian to continue the work, prior to his death in 1995.
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Record #:
27990
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North Carolina produced more naval stores than anyone in the world up until well after the Civil War. Naval stores are products manufactured from pine trees, and used in building and maintaining ships. Due to the abundance of tar, pitch, and turpentine, naval stores such as those in Craven County became central to the state’s economy.
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Record #:
34389
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The abundance of Longleaf Pine trees in North Carolina offered a much-needed resource in the colonies where a flow of goods depended on shipping. Tar, pitch, and turpentine were also essential exports. By 1840, North Carolina produced almost ninety-six percent of all naval stores in the country.
Record #:
36601
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the value of the Long Leaf Pine in the naval stores industry and the present conservation and restoration of pine forests.
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