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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Antebellum period, 1820-1861
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Record #:
21665
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This article examines Clay Dillard's journal describing her last few months as a student at Edgeworth Female Seminary (EFS) in Greensboro in 1856. The journal chronicles Dillard's romantic relationship with a teacher at EFS whom she was not allowed to marry and provided insight into the educational process of the period.
Record #:
21686
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This article looks at Anne Davis, the wife of a Methodist minister and a matron at Wesleyan Female College, and how she was able to exercise her beliefs over her family and the female students. The article also looks at her diary from 1835 onward and connects her actions to her inner beliefs.
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Record #:
21722
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This article examines the temperance movement of antebellum Rowan County from its early beginnings in the late 18th century, to the height of its power in the 1850s, and subsequent collapse by 1860.
Record #:
21816
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This article examines the relationship between Confederate identity and conceptions of Christianity, manhood, patriotism, and class in the antebellum South through the wartime diary of North Carolina lawyer and Confederate bureaucrat David Schenck.
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Record #:
28196
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Wilmington’s bustling economy and prosperous port in the colonial and antebellum periods made it accessible for artists seeking a comfortable living in the city. Several venues in Wilmington became a location for guest lecturers to utilize, while also well-known musicians such as Ole Bull and Maurice Strakosch.
Record #:
36988
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One of the two standing antebellum depots in North Carolina becomes part of history in the making as a site for weddings and transportation museum opened year around. Its architectural history is still in view in parts of the original structure intact, such as its doors and ceiling beams. Ways it has played a part of the state’s history was Confederate headquarters and stop on the Wilmington to Weldon railroad line.
Record #:
36123
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New Bern’s denizens have an equivalent of Tara on Washington Post Road. The dwelling built in 1760 translated the reel version of antebellum South to real life, as the Spaight family, the builders of Bellair, experienced it. Thompson’s article offers another connection with Bellair by a letter written in the house in 1776 by Mary Murphrey.
Record #:
38127
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The Hyde County house built in 1857 continues to draw attention for reasons that go beyond its unique architectural design. Thus far, two restoration phases are complete: a matching grant from the Covington Foundation yielded a repaired roof; phase two involved raising the house to make room for brick piers. As for phase three, fundraising and expert advice from the State Preservation Office is part of the plan for repairs on outside surfaces and the first floor fireplaces.