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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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31 results for "Race relations"
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Record #:
39992
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This was a transcript of an interview with Malinda Lowery, in which she discussed her book, The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle. Her responses focused on Lumbee history lessons that can offer better solutions for particular social and environmental issues. George Lowry’s pursuit of recompense for his sons’ murders can inspire those experiencing racial injustice. A perspective stressing deeper kinship with the natural world can model effective ways to cope with natural disasters like hurricanes.
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Record #:
34683
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Born in Germany to a North Carolina-native mother, Michael Gotting grew up with his adopted German, white family. He has ties to North Carolina, Berlin, and now Canada. Having roots in all of these places has helped him develop themes for his writing, specifically racism and music.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 26 Issue , 2017, p34-47, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
28821
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After two young African-American men were shot and killed by Raleigh cops, city officials say it’s necessary to understand different truths. Meetings are being held through Raleigh's Community Conversations Series, which is designed to facilitate a dialogue between residents, police officers, and elected officials about race and police relations.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 45, Nov 2016, p8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34451
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Many of North Carolina’s 4-H programs remained racially segregated through the 1980s despite open membership policies and legislation. This article addresses four aspects of 4-H and race—organizational inequalities, white support of black members, black activism and advocacy, and eventual racial integration of 4-H clubs.
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Record #:
34660
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In 1931, Paul Green was asked to change the ending of his play by the directors. The old ending involved the murder of one white former sharecropper by two black sharecroppers after she married the wealthy landowner, while the new ending would spare her life to create a positive image of rising above the class she was born into. This change was originally thought to have been made to cater to the ideology that one can rise about their rank to attain fortune. However, Vines argues that the original ending depicted the real tensions between the white and black populations of the South after reconstruction, and the new ending ignores these issues.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p72-85, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
22707
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On a journey from Mobile, Alabama to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the schooner HARRY A. BERWIND experienced gunfire on the morning of October 10, 1905. A black sailor was said to have murdered all the white crew and ordered surviving crew to sail to Cape Fear. Although the story is mentioned infrequently it provides important information on life at sea and relationships between races, particularly with federal court handling of cases involving black and foreign nationals, at the dawn of the twentieth century.
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Record #:
24898
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An examination of the life of an average citizen living in Charlotte in 1968 provides a view of the history of race relations, from the desegregation lunch counters to the still-present dangers for African Americans today.
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Record #:
21753
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This article examines the efforts in Wilson County between 1941 and 1953 by educational activists who fought for equal educational opportunities for African-American students. The article discusses the poor conditions forced upon students and the role of the NAACP and activist Mark Sharpe has in improving those conditions.
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Record #:
27869
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A recent press conference held by the Chapel Hill-Carrboro NAACP expresses the feelings of many in the community. The issue of falling test scores for low-income and minority students and the lack of minorities enrolled in honors courses were the subject of the press conference. Scores were initially rising until new standards were implemented over the past five years. A change in mindset and new leadership is needed to reduce the gap according to some observers.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 9, March 2010, p5, 9 Periodical Website
Record #:
28005
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Filmmaker and journalist Cash Michaels, wrote, directed, and produced Obama in NC: The Path to History. Michael’s documentary is about North Carolina’s racial issues from Reconstruction through the election of Barack Obama. Michaels shares his thoughts on the anti-diversity stance by the Wake County Schools Board of Education, President Obama, and issues of race in North Carolina.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 34, August 2010, p16-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
21781
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This article examines the study by economist Robinson Newcomb on African-American business enterprises in the U.S. South in the 1920s. Newcomb's study met with resistance from white academics and civic leaders. His work at the Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina is also discussed.
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Record #:
21782
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This article examines the Blue Ridge YMCA conference center near the town of Black Mountain and its attempts to better race relations in the U.S. South. The 1906 founding of the center by Willis Duke Weatherford is also discussed, as it was one of the only social institutions in the South where racial issues were openly discussed.
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Record #:
25422
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After 150 students showed up at ECU President Leo Jenkins’ front door, new changes were made to better incorporate the African American student body and make their life at ECU more comfortable.
Record #:
25660
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UNC doctoral student Darin Waters is writing the history of the Young Men’s Institute Cultural Center at the Biltmore Estate, which has offered educational programs and other services for African Americans in Asheville since 1893. Waters discovered the Biltmore Estate did not did not force African Americans to leave; rather, Biltmore was part of a mutual agreement that relied on the help of black craftsman and philanthropy.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28186
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The Anathoth Community Garden is a symbol of peace-building among the diverse populations who live in Cedar Grove, NC. Founded after respected community member Bill King was murdered, the garden works to address the economic injustices that lay behind racial tensions. The garden serves many of the communities poorest residents through the donation of its produce and encourages community building among its members.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 50, December 2008, p29-31 Periodical Website