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25 results for "Portsmouth Island--History"
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Record #:
37370
Abstract:
Getting to Portsmouth Island is a challenge but the journey is worth the effort, according to the author. Among the perks Portsmouth has to offer is an environment that may make one feel as if a trip has been taken back in time. Reason noted by Rumley for this feeling: Portsmouth’s population has dwindled to summer tourists and fishermen; the place hasn’t changed much since its Colonial beginnings.
Record #:
34972
Author(s):
Abstract:
Portsmouth Island sits on the southern tip of the Outer Banks in North Carolina. Once a booming fishing and shipping town, it now sits abandoned except by tourists. Every two years, descendants of the island’s residents hold a reunion to celebrate the influence of Portsmouth in their lives.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p122-130, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28693
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Rudy Austin and his family are Ocracoke Island natives who have made it possible for people to visit Portsmouth Island via boat for 40 years. Austin’s father once worked on the now uninhabited island and started taking visitors to the island when the National Park Service took over its management in the 1970s. The Austin’s are the only ferry service and as they age, many wonder what will happen to Portsmouth Island.
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Record #:
15795
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Abstract:
The last residents left Portsmouth Island long ago, and now a 1930s fishing village stands empty. Reachable only by boat, the island is preserved by the National Park Service as a reminder of the old days. for those who visit, the island holds a fascination of long ago coastal living.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 8, Jan 2012, p76-78, 80, 82-83, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
16233
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cecelski discusses a series of interviews done with former residents of Portsmouth Island, founded in 1754 and abandoned in 1971. Stories shed light on Outer Banks history and culture.
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Record #:
34751
Author(s):
Abstract:
The island of Portsmouth, located 25 miles from mainland North Carolina, was valued for raising livestock. During the early 19th century, sheep, horses, cattle, and goats were reared by the small community. Storm activity in the early 1800s threatened the livestock on the island as it destroyed much of their grazing areas. Apart from these animals, the island served little agricultural purpose as only sweet potatoes were well adapted to the salty soil.
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Record #:
34746
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Abstract:
Portsmouth Island was home to sailing captains, fishermen, lighters, hunters, and wrackers in the historic era. This community was dependent on the ocean and island resources. While the residents have long vanished, their stories remain preserved in a number of buildings on the island. The Methodist church and personal cemeteries bear witness to the past lives which created the small community.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p11-15, il
Record #:
16242
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eason details the return of 400 people in Portsmouth Village, an island ghost town on the northernmost reach of Cape Lookout National Seashore. With a brief history of Portsmouth Island, Eason remarks on the current state of the area and attempts to bring this ghost town to life.
Record #:
34672
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Abstract:
During the Colonial period, sheep were popular livestock raised throughout Carteret County. The wool was used for home spun clothing while lamb and mutton were staples in the local diet. Sheep were so prevalent that Portsmouth Island was also known as “Sheep Island.”
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p5, map
Record #:
34650
Abstract:
During the 17th century, North American colonial merchants were responsible for conducting coastal trade and assumed all responsibility for shipping, storing, and selling trade goods. While this system fell out of practice during the 18th century in many North American colonies, it remained the primary trade system in Carteret County. The town of Portsmouth is one example of this system. Established in 1754, town residents facilitated handling and transportation of merchant cargoes throughout the Outer Banks. A customs official was stationed in Portsmouth to inspect and tax goods coming in and out of the county.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p25-26, map
Record #:
4233
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village of Portsmouth on North Core Banks, a once bustling fishing village, stands uninhabited since the last residents left in 1971. The village, founded in 1753, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and contains twenty structures, including a post office, church, and several cemeteries. Around 700 people visit Portsmouth each month in warm weather.
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Record #:
4234
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Abstract:
Jessie Lee Babb Dominique was born in Portsmouth on August 2, 1927. She was the last child born in the village, which at that time numbered around 100. She recounts her memories of island life, including the arrival of the mailboat. Her mother, sister Marian Gray Babb, and aunt Elma Dixon were the island's last residents. They left in 1971.
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Record #:
3137
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Because of a need to provide medical care to seriously ill seamen on the Outer Banks, Congress authorized construction of the state's first hospital. It was built between 1846 and 1847 in the town of Portsmouth, on Portsmouth Island.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 6, Oct 1996, p6-9, il
Record #:
19181
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Portsmouth Village is quiet now, but its history tells the story of a once-bustling community established on trans-shipment. Today, its stands as part of National Register of Historic Places.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Feb 1984, p2-3, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
9751
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village of Portsmouth, located on North Core Banks, was founded in 1753 and was once a bustling fishing village. Today it is empty - a village of deserted buildings and no residents, except for a few visiting fishermen and beachcombers.
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