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12 results for "Stem, Thad, Jr"
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Record #:
8901
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Tobacco advertising has changed through the years. Early 19th-century advertisements featured men and women joyously smoking and walking together. J.B. Duke created the first major tobacco advertising campaign with Bull Durham cigarettes. He also sold the first cigarettes marketed for women: White Rose and American Beauties, and conceived the idea of including picture-cards in cigarette packs that served as advertisement and stiffened the cigarette box offering greater protection for the tobacco. In 1911 R.J. Reynolds began a marketing campaign that focused on only one cigarette -- Camels.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p34-35, il, por
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Record #:
8604
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Henry Ford made his first Model T in 1903. When people bought the car, they had to buy a number of accessories to go with it, including a fanbelt guide so that the belt wouldn't slip off the pulley. For a number of years, the Model T had to be hand-cranked, which required training and practice. Anti-Rattlers could be purchased and attached to the Model T in various locations to reduce sound. Blacksmiths made bumpers for Model T owners and the car's tires punctured frequently. Despite these and other problems, the Model T brought towns closer together in proximity and put Americans on the roads.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983, p15-16, 31, il
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Record #:
9302
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The umbrella, owned by monarchs and kings in the 12th century B.C., was the first symbol of status. Made of leather and expensive, umbrellas disappeared until the 17th century when it was made with lighter cloth. It was used first by writers and university professors in New England and by doctors in the South.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p27-28
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Record #:
8968
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Although Governor William Bradford of Plymouth Colony proclaimed a day of Thanksgiving in 1621, it was not until Abraham Lincoln officially made Thanksgiving the last Thursday in November that the holiday was celebrated with any regularity. This was in 1863 and, in 1941, after much confusion when FDR moved Thanksgiving to the third Thursday, Congress declared Thanksgiving to be held on the last Thursday of November, when it is still celebrated today.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p9-11, il
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Record #:
9250
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In the first half of the 20th-century, many families who were not affluent had to spend their summers at home rather than vacationing elsewhere. However, they often found much to do in their hometowns. Most towns had a Silver Cornet Band, a baseball team, and a trolley line. People threw parties at the trolley's terminus, and often visited family members who lived in rural areas. A continuation of this article appears in the July 1978 edition of THE STATE.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978, p10-13, 73, il
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Record #:
9266
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A road show, called the Chautauqua, originated in the small town of Chautauqua, New York. Two dramatic groups were organized to tour the country, usually performing plays with some underlying moral principle. The Chautauqua ultimately became a road show, combining a revival and a county fair. Other fraudulent Chautauquas sprung up, but none was ever as successful or morally conscious as the original.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Aug 1978, p17-18, 31, il
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Record #:
9262
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A continuation of a piece started in the June 1978 issue of THE STATE. The continuation discusses pastimes such as picnicking and warehouse dancing.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 2, July 1978, p20
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Record #:
24485
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This article presents the history of cigarettes, tobacco, and smoking in North Carolina, as well as presenting a number of historic advertisements for cigarettes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 9, February 1978, p10-15, il
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Record #:
35647
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Some of Stem’s notes on black music history: its African origins and intermingling with Christian hymns; noted musicians like the Jubilee singers and Scott Joplin; and types of melodies, such as roustabouts, work songs and spirituals.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p42-43
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Record #:
21266
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This article discusses the history of printing in North Carolina beginning with the first public printer in 1749 through the many newspapers and editors of the 20th century. Despite being one of the last of the original colonies to get a printing press, the history of newspapers in North Carolina is an exciting one as told through the stories of many local papers and their editors.
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Record #:
35351
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The author reflects on the various poems, biblical writings, stories, and writings down my famous historical figures that allude to finding the cure for male flaccidity via herbal remedies.
Record #:
35186
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This article contains three fictional stories, “The Tobacco Auctioneer,” “The Patron Saint,” and “A Worthless Lawyer.”
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