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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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Record #:
25474
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Abstract:
Long before joining the faculty at East Carolina, Carroll V. Dashiell, Jr. learned from the music industry’s greatest and performed with the Boston Pops, National Symphony, and Washington Philharmonic Orchestra. As a music educator at East Carolina, Dashiell gets to share his passion for music, specifically jazz, and bringing that genre to the masses.
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Record #:
28931
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Abstract:
In an interview with Jim Ketch of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Music Department, Ketch discussed North Carolina’s place in the jazz world. He talked about the influence of Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane on jazz, and how jazz music is evolving throughout the state.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p4-5, por
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Record #:
29017
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Abstract:
The Museum of Durham History has a new exhibit, Durham A-Z: J is for Jazz. The exhibit covers Durham’s half-century history of jazz music and musicians, as well as the development of North Carolina Central University’s jazz program.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 15, April 2017, p26, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35647
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Some of Stem’s notes on black music history: its African origins and intermingling with Christian hymns; noted musicians like the Jubilee singers and Scott Joplin; and types of melodies, such as roustabouts, work songs and spirituals.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p42-43
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Record #:
36856
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chatterly is a documentary photographer, the subjects of his pictures jazz and blues musicians. Many projects hace developed beyod his original designs into richer, fuller collections because of his interest in people’s lives.
Record #:
36052
Author(s):
Abstract:
The title could also describe the era in which the profiled photos were taken. One featured six of the eighteen students with an instrument popular during the decade. The other showed students who could hold their own on either side of the steering wheel. The photos, just like the accompanied text, proved Wilson County club members aptly represented college students and young women the country over.