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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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60 results for "Kelly, Susan Stafford"
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Record #:
34957
Abstract:
The Crossnore School & Children’s Home, built in 1917, has become famous for its weaving room, created in 1920. The weavers are experts in handloom weaving, using a large loom with materials such as linen, wool, pearl cotton, alpaca, and more.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p78-82, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34954
Abstract:
Pender County, North Carolina hosts a small vineyard called Bannerman Vineyard and Winery. A small operation of 18-acres, the winery creates only muscadine wines and juices, but still have created a loyal following of fans, some as far away as Maryland and Ohio.
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Record #:
37008
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For Kelly, the difference between supper and dinner is the food on the plate and the occasion being formal or informal. With those distinctions in mind, the author suggests that, since the South is a casual region, the evening meal should be called supper and never with a capital S.
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Record #:
37016
Abstract:
One woodsman proves that some tools are still standard, despite the ubiquity of digital based technology. His promotion of horse power is extended to teaching students from Appalachian State how to use this tool. Tasks mentioned by the author where horse power is useful included cleaning debris from a graveyard or clearing a mountainside for a bird habitat.
Record #:
37024
Abstract:
With voices soaring heavenward, the author asserts choirs resemble what awaits the faithful on both sides of the pew. As for the choir’s role, Kelly posits it is can greatly influence the quality of life—church life now and life hereafter.
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Record #:
36990
Abstract:
Among the 1,100 cameras in Ken Toda’s Huemax are 1940s reporter cameras, 1920s’ portrait photographer cameras, and 1880s wet-plate cameras. Toda, who assists collectors and hobbyists worldwide, helps to upkeep High Point’s role in developing photography as a medium.
Record #:
36991
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Abstract:
The word keepsake may bring up images of items fragile and collectible: not for everyday use. In Castle’s case, the heirloom that has lasted the test of time weighs six pounds. The pictured heirloom, which has inspired a collection of kitchen tools, has a value beyond measure.
Record #:
36971
Abstract:
Morton Academy, a schoolhouse slated for demolition, can educate generations to come about the school experience of yesteryear, thanks to the efforts of two locals. Hints of what this experience was like was offered in this article through information about the typical 19th century schoolhouse and Onslow County schoolhouses in the early 20th century.
Record #:
36959
Abstract:
A companion to “Hole in the Wall Joints: Tried and True,” this article profiled nine restaurants located in towns stretching from the coast to the mountains and whose menus range from seafood to snacks. Local spots that became the hearts of their towns included Waterfront Seafood Shack, Kitty Hawk; Allen and Son, Chapel Hill; and Dots Dario, Marion.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 3, August 2017, p90-94, 96, 98, 100-102, 104, 106, 108, 110-114 Periodical Website
Record #:
24787
Abstract:
In 1954, Whiteville funeral director A.D. Peacock discovered seven children living in dire conditions without any familial support. This experience prompted Peacock to found what is today known as the Boys & Girls Homes of North Carolina, a permanent residence program for at-risk children.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 8, January 2016, p122-123, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25100
Abstract:
Three antique shops in North Carolina have a number of collectors’ items that one may not find in larger antique stores. This article describes the Antique Tobacco Barn in Asheville, SuzAnna’s Antiques in Raleigh, and Seaport Antiques in Morehead City, highlighting the types of antiques found in each.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p108-110, 112-115, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
26732
Abstract:
The Grimes Plantation is one of the oldest properties in Pitt County and it was named for Confederate general Bryan Grimes who became a prominent farmer in Pitt County after the Civil War. Eddie Smith, a native of Lexington, has restored Grimesland Plantation to its original painting and details.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p82-101, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26734
Abstract:
Bee Charmer is a honey tasting bar located in the heart of downtown Asheville that boasts a wide variety of honeys from all around the world. Very similar to a wine tasting bar, Bee Charmer has honeys from Italy, France, and other countries.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p110-112, 114, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26740
Abstract:
Located in Warren County touching the border with Virginia, Ridgeway is one of the lesser-known food capitals of North Carolina, and some of their principle cantaloupe farmers are the Holtzmann family. The Holtzmann family even have documents related to cantaloupe shipments associated with the 1939 meeting between President Franklin D. Roosevelt and King George VI.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p146-152, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27406
Abstract:
Plant nurseries and their owners from all throughout North Carolina are given reviews. Plant nurseries are included from Raleigh, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and Arden.
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