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7 results for Reynolds family
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Record #:
3681
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reynolda House, the Winston-Salem home of tobacco baron Richard and Katherine Reynolds, houses an outstanding collection of American art. The 44,000-square-foot house, built between 1906 and 1917, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Full Text:
Record #:
7237
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reynolda House, built between 1906 and 1917 in Winston-Salem, was the home of tobacco baron Richard Reynolds and his wife Katherine. It opened to the public in 1967 as a museum, one of the first in the country to specialize in American art. The museum has opened a $12 million, three-story addition, the Mary and Charles Babcock Wing, named for the daughter and son-in-law of the Reynolds's. The 30,000-square-foot addition includes galleries, an expanded museum store, and an auditorium.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p10, il
Record #:
7305
Abstract:
Reynolda House, built between 1906 and 1917 in Winston-Salem, was the home of tobacco baron Richard Reynolds and his wife Katherine. It opened to the public in 1967 as a museum, one of the first in the country to specialize in American art. On April 1, 2005, the museum will open a $12 million, three-story addition, the Mary and Charles Babcock Wing, named for the daughter and son-in-law of the Reynolds's. The 30,000-square-foot addition includes a new visitor center, orientation gallery, video, acoustic guides, oral history stations, museum store, two-level auditorium, art library, a changing exhibition gallery, and education studios.
Source:
Record #:
8841
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pole Hollow, a small valley between Pinnacle and Pilot Mountain, played host to Richard J. Reynolds, Jr. and his mother in 1910. Only five-years-old at the time, Reynolds was part of the famous Reynolds tobacco manufacturing family, and his mother asked everyone to call him “Dick.”
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p22-23, il, por
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Record #:
32341
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the most carefully assembled and discriminating small-scale collections of American painting is found at the Reynolda House near Winston-Salem. Opened to the public in 1967, the house is the former home of tobacco company founder Richard Joshua Reynolds. The Reynolds art collection includes paintings of notable artists such as Benjamin West, John Singleton Copley, and Andrew Wyeth.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 32 Issue 12, Dec 1974, p22-47, il, por
Record #:
34887
Abstract:
Reynolda House in Winston-Salem, North Carolina has had sprawling gardens since it’s construction. But only after Mary Reynolds Babcock took over the estate after her parents’ death did they became even more extensive. She even created rooms in the house specifically for gardening and flower arranging. Her flower care notes are now on display at the Reynolda House.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p132-140, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
36124
Abstract:
Expected was the 1910 celebration: it was the bicentennial of New Bern’s founding. As for one not expected, the author explained its coming from the “tenor of the times.” It, hosted by the newly created historical society, had a guest list including descendants of Baron Christopher de Graffenried and Colonial homes open to visitors. Another aspect remembrance worthy was the first contribution to Tryon Palace’s 1950s restoration, a surplus from funds for the 1929 event.