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8 results for Art museums
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Record #:
2704
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state has more art galleries and museums than counties. Ten sites, including Blue Spiral I in Asheville, The Light Factory in Charlotte, the African Heritage Center in Greensboro, and Artspace in Raleigh, are profiled.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Feb 1996, p29-32, il
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Record #:
12929
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Abstract:
Initiated by Robert Lee Humper of Greenville, legislators appropriated one million dollars to purchase an art collection to match a gift of paintings worth another million by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. These works of art now hang in the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. Other art galleries established across the state include galleries in Charlotte, Asheville, Winston-Salem, Hickory, Greensboro, Greenville, and Fayetteville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 6, Aug 1959, p12-13, il
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Record #:
12956
Author(s):
Abstract:
Initiated by Robert Lee Humper of Greenville, legislators appropriated one million dollars to purchase an art collection to match a gift of paintings worth another million by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. These works of art now hang in the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. Other art galleries established across the state include galleries in Charlotte, Asheville, Winston-Salem, Hickory, Greensboro, Greenville, and Fayetteville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 6, Aug 1959, p12-13, il
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Record #:
27376
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke University’s Museum of Art has seen many changes over the last four years under new director Dr. Michael Mezzatesta. The building and galleries have been updated and interdepartmental cooperation has been important to the museum’s success. This cooperation with other disciplines has led to the award of a National Endowment for the Humanities Planning Grant. Plans are also underway to build a new art museum between the East and West Campuses. The new building will showcase their major holdings of Pre-Columbian Art, one of the premier collections of such art in the world.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 6, Feb. 6-12 1991, p27 Periodical Website
Record #:
22573
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using a greenhouse of glass negatives, Harry Taylor presents glass-plate negatives of landscapes, historic sites, models and reenactors around Wilmington in a new exhibit, Requiem Glasshouse. Featured at Wilmington's Cameron Art Museum, Taylor's ambrotypes utilize nineteenth century methods to capture modern subjects in Civil War soul.
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Record #:
29518
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Abstract:
The challenge of presenting a borrowed exhibit from a new perspective is discussed by John Coffey. Coffey is the curator of the show Still Life: Masterpieces on loan from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Coffey discusses why the exhibit was brought to Raleigh, how museum’s plan for the installation of an exhibit, the reason for the placement of certain of the artworks, and other details about the exhibit.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2013, p6-11
Record #:
32341
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the most carefully assembled and discriminating small-scale collections of American painting is found at the Reynolda House near Winston-Salem. Opened to the public in 1967, the house is the former home of tobacco company founder Richard Joshua Reynolds. The Reynolds art collection includes paintings of notable artists such as Benjamin West, John Singleton Copley, and Andrew Wyeth.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 32 Issue 12, Dec 1974, p22-47, il, por
Record #:
36579
Author(s):
Abstract:
A house restored to its former glory has been home in many ways since its construction by Peter Demens, co-founder of St. Petersburg, Florida. Illustrations of its illustrious history: stop-off in the social scene of the 1890s and 1910s; site for the Ida Jolly Crawley Museum of Art and Archaeology, Asheville’s first public museum.