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18 results for "Huler, Scott"
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Record #:
25104
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T. Gilbert Pearson, an avid birder throughout much of his life, founded the Audubon Society of North Carolina in 1902. He also helped organize the National Association of Audubon Societies and pushed the first statewide game commission law in the Southeast through the North Carolina General Assembly. Pearson’s tireless efforts to preserve the bird population in North Carolina saved birds throughout the world.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p188-191, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23912
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John Lawson explored the Carolinas in 1700, during which time he wrote a detailed description of his journey from Charleston, through what is now the Charlotte and Hillsborough areas, and finally ending in little Washington. Canoer and writer, Scott Huler, aspires to retrace Lawson's journey and see how the Carolinas have changed since Lawson's time.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p142-144, 146, 148, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23944
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As the two largest cities in North Carolina, Charlotte and Raleigh seemingly compete against each other. Author and journalist Scott Huler, insists that the cities do not actually compete, but rather learn from each other's triumphs and mistakes.
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24264
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Seersucker has been a part of Southern dress since the early twentieth century, though the fabric's history stretches back a number of centuries. The lightweight fabric and classic design makes for the perfect summer suit and is still popular today.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 3, August 2015, p156-160, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24747
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The city of Raleigh dates back to the late eighteenth century and it has undergone a number of structural changes ever since. Author Scott Huler examines Raleigh through the history of its streets and parks, reflecting on how the early grid system influenced Raleigh’s growth over the years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 7, December 2015, p58. 60, 62, 64, 66-67, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
21670
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Huler describes the new state-of-the-art Hunt Library at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. \"Robot\" librarians are among one of its most interesting features. A patron selects a title from a computer; a robot glides down a 160-foot-long, 50-feet tall, steel alley, finds the drawer holding the requested title, and retrieves it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p56-62, 64, 66, 68, 70, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22099
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They are long out of date and they were large-size and not as convenient as today's GPS, but without those maps of centuries ago, people then would have been lost. Huler visits Jay Lester to examine his collection of original, highly prized old maps, some dating back to the 16th century. Huler discusses what can be learned about history and people from these colorful creations by the cartographers of the day and what the maps of today will tell the future generations about us. He and Lester make a visit to the Vault Room at UNC Wilson Library to see the map collection there.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p64-66, 68, 70-74, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22252
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Buy it in stores or concoct it yourself, pimento cheese is the South's hallmark sandwich. Huler recounts some of its history and how to have it alone or in combination with other foods.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p124-126, 128, 130, 132, 134, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24600
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Archie Davis helped found North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park in the 1960s. The park opened with the goals of providing jobs and working for education on and off campus. Throughout its existence, it has done both by working with the nearby universities and by drawing companies, like IBM, to the area.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p44-46, 48,50-51, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24614
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The Blue Ridge Parkway, built by the Works Progress Administration, was intended to be a pleasant driving experience and a way to travel from Shenandoah National Park to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In North Carolina, there are 25 tunnels on the Blue Ridge Parkway, ranging in length from 150 feet to 1,434 feet long.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p140-144, 146, 148, 150, 152, 154, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22625
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Thanks to the State Library of North Carolina"s (Raleigh) extensive digital preservation project, more than 90,000 document and artifacts--including the entire back catalog of issues of Our State Magazine--are digitally available, free online.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 7, December 2014, p178-180, 182, 184, 186, por Periodical Website
Record #:
19622
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Huler describes Hanging Rock State Park from its rock formations of some 500 million years ago to its resort period of the 19th century when it catered to wealthy travelers and finally to the park's construction in the 20th century by the Civilian Conservation Corps.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 1, June 2013, p194-196, 198, 200, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20136
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Huler discusses the history of the screen door and its importance to the southern culture of North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 3, Aug 2013, p104-106, 108, 110, 112-113, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
20800
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Opened in 1953, Dorton Arena in Raleigh is one of North Carolina's most ambitious and historically significant pieces of architecture. When construction was completed in 1952, it won First Honor Award of the American Institute of Architects and the Gold Medal in Engineering of the Architectural League of New York. In 1972, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places and in 2002 it was dedicated as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The designer was Matthew Nowicki, who was killed in a 1950 plane crash before construction began. It was the first permanent building in the world to support its roof by suspended steel cables.
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Record #:
21827
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Betty Levitas, a member of the singing group Stella, describes the The Murphey School Radio Show as follows: \"It happens twice a year. This community [writers, musicians, and friends] appears and then disappears,\" coming together for a weekend, creating a wonderful show, and then it's gone, not to return for another six months. Huler explains why the show has this particular name. It is broadcast over station WCHL in Chapel Hill and on the internet.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p32, 34, il, por Periodical Website
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