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20 results for Raleigh--History
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Record #:
7417
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Since Reconstruction days, no Republican presidential candidate had carried a Southern state. President Theodore Roosevelt, one of the nation's most popular presidents, was invited to make an address in Raleigh on October 19, 1905. Roosevelt thought his personal popularity and the fact that his mother was from Georgia might help in future elections. Lawing recounts the events of Roosevelt's visit to Raleigh and Durham.
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Record #:
8812
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The Joel Lane house, located in Raleigh, was where the decision as to where to locate the state's capitol building was made. The home, built in 1760, was home to Joel Lane's family. Lane was born in Halifax County to parents who had emigrated from England. He served in the General Assembly and in 1770 introduced a bill that created Wake County. Following independence, the state legislature decided to locate the state's capital in Wake County. Lane hosted the nine-member committee whose job was to decide where in Wake County to place the capital. After an amusing night of entertainment in the Lane house, the committee decided to buy 1,000 acres of property that belonged to Joel Lane. This property became the site of North Carolina's capital. The home was bought by the Wake County of Colonial Dames in 1927. They began a major renovation project on the home in 1968 and the house was opened to the public in 1976.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p23-24, por
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Record #:
13626
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There was plenty of excitement in Raleigh back in 1831 when the State House, Library, and several private residences were destroyed in the burning of the state capitol.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 16, Sept 1951, p11, il
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Record #:
13823
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Proposed in 1881 and again, in 1951, the Durham Bill was a legislative attempt to resolve the long time feud over boundary lines separating Durham and Raleigh.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 31, Jan 1953, p55-56
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Record #:
16843
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Seventeen aldermen and one mayor were responsible for Raleigh's government in 1880. These men dealt with the problems of a growing city because Raleigh's population had doubled during the post-Civil War Reconstruction years. The men were elected from Raleigh's different wards and addressed problems of sanitation, organizing police and firemen, and improving city streets.
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Record #:
18962
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Lawrence lists chronologically important events that have happened in Raleigh since the arrival of John Lawson, the first white man to visit the area in 1708.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 37, Feb 1943, p4-5, 26, il
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Record #:
20785
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Lawrence describes the Raleigh he remembers as a boy growing up in the 1880s, together with some facts concerning other interesting eras.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 43, Mar 1947, p9, 34
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Record #:
20928
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The term \"New South\" often applied to the resurgence of cities like Birmingham and Atlanta. This article evaluates whether Raleigh, and the city's growth between 1876 and 1895, can be characterized as having the qualities of the New South. Based on a set of four criteria, the author concludes Raleigh embraced a New South spirit because of its reconcilliatory attitudes towards the North.
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Record #:
24063
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Streetcars were an important part of North Carolina towns during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Originally, mules and horses pulled these cars, but in 1889, Asheville opened the first electric streetcar system in the state. Charlotte and Raleigh followed, and the streetcar allowed such cities to expand and establish suburban neighborhoods. By the 1930s, automobiles and buses replaced the streetcar, but today the system has been revived in the form of Charlotte's CityLYNX Gold Line, which runs three replica trolleys on a 1.5-mile track.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 5, October 2015, p43-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24355
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Throughout its two-hundred year history, the city of Raleigh has enjoyed importance as a center of business with considerable impact on North Carolina’s economy overall.
Record #:
24747
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The city of Raleigh dates back to the late eighteenth century and it has undergone a number of structural changes ever since. Author Scott Huler examines Raleigh through the history of its streets and parks, reflecting on how the early grid system influenced Raleigh’s growth over the years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 7, December 2015, p58. 60, 62, 64, 66-67, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
21968
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This article discusses the founding of the colony, that would one day become the State of North Carolina, by land grants from Charles II and the establishing of a capital founded in Raleigh.
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Record #:
27491
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North Raleigh was the site of major growth during the 1980s. As people flocked to the Research Triangle and Raleigh grew, many of its more wealthy citizens moved north to new subdivisions and the suburbs. Author Melinda Ruley was a teenager during that movement and experienced the move to Raleigh firsthand. Looking back, she suggests that life was good, but devoid of personality and life. Ruley looks back on that the growth, the changing of Raleigh, and the citizens who lived there.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 36, September 5-11 1990, p8-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27650
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Raleigh’s historic neighborhood Oakwood has been in the national spotlight over the past few years. A walking tour of the neighborhood by the American Institute of Architects offers a way of understanding what makes the neighborhood special. The North Carolina Victorian, the Second Empire, the Queen Anne, Neoclassical revival, Craftsman, and even modernist styles are all represented. Some of the history of the neighborhood and its architecture are explored by the author on one such tour.
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Record #:
27807
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The end of the Civil War and its effect on Raleigh is explored. Both Confederate and Union troops took any and all livestock, goods, and material they could find during the last three weeks of the war. The Confederate troops were ordered to do this to prevent Gen. William T. Sherman’s troop from using the supplies. The physical evidence left by the war that is still visible in Raleigh and sites of major significance in Raleigh during the war are also described.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p20-21, 23 Periodical Website