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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Lemmon, Sarah McCulloh
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Record #:
20494
Abstract:
This article looks at the genesis of the Protestant Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina including the settlement of the colony and the establishment of the Church of England in the region, church politics and vestry elections, problems with clergy, establishment of new parishes, education, and changes within the church during and after the American Revolution.
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Record #:
20886
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This article is a social history of entertainment in Raleigh in 1890 with a particular focus on music, church entertainment, parties, fairs, club events, circuses, picnic seasons, beach or mountain trips, dances and balls, African American entertainment, theater, dining, baseball, and beverages.
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Record #:
20928
Abstract:
The term \"New South\" often applied to the resurgence of cities like Birmingham and Atlanta. This article evaluates whether Raleigh, and the city's growth between 1876 and 1895, can be characterized as having the qualities of the New South. Based on a set of four criteria, the author concludes Raleigh embraced a New South spirit because of its reconcilliatory attitudes towards the North.
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Record #:
21091
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This biographical essay looks at the life and career of clergyman Nathaniel Blount, the longest-lived Anglican clergyman to survive the American Revolution.
Record #:
21200
Abstract:
A personal recollection of travel by, and use of, various modes of 20th century transportation written by Sarah McCulloh Lemmon, PhD, professor and dean of Continuing Education and Special Programs at Meredith College in Raleigh.
Record #:
21239
Abstract:
During the War of 1812, the majority of North Carolina citizens supported military action against Great Britain. There was though, a noticeable amount of hesitation and dissent for war on the part of the common man, North Carolina state leaders and national representatives.
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Record #:
16065
Abstract:
During the War of 1812, Captain Otway Burns became a notorious privateer. He purchased the vessel Snap Dragon in New York and proceeded to captured approximately $2,500,000 worth of prizes, including value of ships and their cargos. Following the war, the experienced captain continued as a merchant until his death in 1848.
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Record #:
36475
Abstract:
The author gives the reasons WWI started and how North Carolina felt about the war.
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