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4 results for Water Resources Research Institute News Vol. Issue 332, Nov/Dec 2001
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Record #:
34333
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pending change in Natural Resources Conservation Service standards for designing nutrient management plans for animal waste operations could force some animal producers in North Carolina to look for additional land on which to apply wastes. The unfavorable nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio in manures has often resulted in an overapplication of phosphorus, which can further dissolve in soil water and seep into groundwater. North Carolina is identifying soil sites with high potential for phosphorus loss.
Record #:
34334
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following a three-year effort to improve coastal land-use planning, the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commission adopted changes to Coastal Area Management Act (CAMA) land-use planning guidelines in October. CAMA requires the twenty coastal counties to prepare land-use plans, but planning is optional for municipalities in those counties. The new guidelines offer three levels of plans that give local governments flexibility to meet local needs, while seeking to improve protection of coastal water quality.
Record #:
34332
Author(s):
Abstract:
Effective water quality management is built on a foundation of water quality standards that are expressed in a manner that makes compliance assessment clear and unambiguous. Most surface water quality standards in North Carolina are based on a chemical criterion value and used to determine if a waterbody is compliant. This article gives an overview of the state’s standards and total maximum daily load (TMDL) program.
Record #:
34335
Author(s):
Abstract:
At a meeting of the North Carolina Drought Monitoring Council on November 8, representatives said that many of North Carolina’s major cities are experiencing “top ten” dry conditions with rainfall deficits exceeded only by the drought of 1986. Precipitation across the state has been from 10-25 inches below normal for the last twenty-four months.