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14 results for Our State Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004
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Record #:
6407
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The North Carolina Award is the highest civilian honor given by the state for a lifetime of achievement in the fields of public service, fine arts, science, and literature. The award has been presented annually since 1964. The award winners for 2003 are Etta Baker, musician; Jaki Shelton Green, author; Frank Borden Hanes, benefactor; James Baxter Hunt, Jr., governor; Mary Ann Scheer, artisan; and William E. Thornton, medicine.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p38-40, 42, por Periodical Website
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6410
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While NASCAR and ACC basketball keep sports fans in the state occupied today, horse racing in eastern North Carolina during the 1700s and early 1800s was the most exciting sporting event around. Blackburn discusses the history of racing in the state, famous horses, like Sir Archie, and their owners.
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6415
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No major Civil War battles were fought in the North Carolina mountains; however, many mountain people did declare either for the North or the South, and evidence remains of the encounters that took placed there. Johnson recounts several of these, including stories of a Confederate Cherokee regiment led by a crazed white man, women bushwhackers who posed as men to join the army, and Union Captain Miles Keough, who captured the town of Boone and later died with Custer at the Little Big Horn.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p68-70, 72, 75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6521
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Traditional music has evolved over the past 250 years in the North Carolina mountains, as migrants from a number of countries brought their distinct musical signatures to the area. This interweaving of cultures created the old-time mountain music which is still continuing to evolve and flourish into the twenty-first century. Kunkel lists a number of places where bluegrass performances can be heard weekly, including Clay's Corner (Brasstown); Balsam Mountain Inn (Balsam); Snowbird Mountain Lodge (Robbinsville); Mars Hill College (Mars Hill); and Shindig on the Green (Asheville).
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6522
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Across North Carolina forty-four roads, or sections of roads, have been designated by the state as scenic byways. Two others have National Scenic Byway designations: the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Cherohala Skyway. Scenic byways vary in length from 3 miles to 173 miles and were chosen for their “cultural, natural, and historic features.” These include the French Broad Overview, Drovers Road Byway, Colonial Heritage Byway, Brunswick Town Road, and Alligator River Route.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p102-107, il Periodical Website
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6523
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Waynesborough, founded in 1787 as the seat of Wayne County, was burned by General Sherman's soldiers in 1865. In the 1980s, the Old Waynesborough Commission decided to recreate the town. Original 18th- and 19th-century buildings were collected around Wayne County and relocated to the old town site. Today more than 15 buildings, including a general store, working blacksmith shop, and one-room school, comprise Waynesborough Historical Village.
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6411
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Morganton, founded in 1784 by an act of the North Carolina General Assembly, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town is a mixture of progress and tradition. History lives on through its many buildings; twenty-one are on the National Register of Historic Places. A vibrant arts community and recreational offerings attract visitors to this Burke County community.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p18-21, il, map Periodical Website
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6414
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Barbecue is the holy grub in North Carolina. Lovers of this delicacy differ over which type is better--vinegar-base barbecue or tomato-base barbecue. Whatever an individual's preference, there are a number of restaurants to satisfy any palate. Early describes a number of these including the Pink Supper House (Wallace); B's Barbecue (Greenville); Barbecue Inn (Asheville); and the Carolina Bar-B-Q (Statesville).
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6412
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Morris recounts the baseball career of Artis Plummer, who played on teams that barnstormed across the South and south of the border fifty years ago. Barnstorming was a way for players to earn money during the off-season. After his baseball career, Plummer opened a sign painting business, Art Signs, a community institution in Durham for fifty years.
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6413
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Adams describes the maritime forests of the Outer Banks, areas that shelter habitats ecologically rich and hauntingly beautiful. These forests are some of the finest and most accessible ones in the state. They are Currituck Banks, Kitty Hawk Woods, Nags Head Woods, Buxton Woods, Shackelford Banks, Theodore Roosevelt State Natural Area, and Bear Island. Buxton Woods is the largest of the group.
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6416
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North Carolina is home to over two dozen wineries, ranging from multi-million dollar operations to small mom-and-pop ones. Chase takes the reader on a tour of several, including RagApple Lassie Vineyards (Boonville); Westbend Vineyards (Lewisville); Windy Gap Vineyards (Ronda); and Chateau Laurinda (Sparta).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p76-78,80-81, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6524
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Wayne County is OUR STATE magazine's featured county of the month. The county is home to three institutions whose names extend beyond county lines: Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, Cherry Hospital, and Mt. Olive Pickle Company. The county also boasts a geological wonder, the Cliffs of the Neuse State Park; the rural cabin where Charles B. Aycock, the education governor, grew up; and the Waynesborough Historical Village.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p142-143, 145-147, il Periodical Website
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6525
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Big Ed's City Market Restaurant is a Raleigh institution. Opened in 1989 in the City Market near the State Capitol, the restaurant now anchors the rejuvenated area. Owner “Big Ed” Watkins offers traditional country cooking, friendly faces, and moderate prices.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p154-155, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
6526
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Adams takes the reader off the beaten path to explore some of the state's most picturesque waterfalls. These include waterfalls on the Linville, Horsepasture, Whitewater, Cullasaja, Big Creek, Little, East Fork Pigeon, and West Fork Pigeon rivers. Directions to each of the falls are included.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p116-118, 120-121, il Periodical Website
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