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25 results for Johnson, Clint
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Record #:
3374
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joseph S. Koury builds on a grand scale in Greensboro - the state's largest convention hotel, largest private convention center, and one of the state's largest shopping centers. Now he is creating Grandover, a $1-billion, 1,500-acre mixed use development.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 6, June 1997, p24-25, por
Record #:
3492
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Julianne Still Thrift, president of Salem Academy and College in Winston-Salem, is mother-away-from-home, motivator, and goal setter for 1,200 young women.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 9, Sept 1997, p8,10-11, por
Record #:
3529
Author(s):
Abstract:
The manufacturing industry provides over thirty percent of the gross state product and twenty-five percent of its jobs. Textiles rank first, followed by furniture, industrial machinery, electronics, food, apparel, and chemicals.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 11, Nov 1997, p12-14,16-21, il
Record #:
3670
Author(s):
Abstract:
For Civil War enthusiasts, the state's beaches offer a number of places to visit, including Roanoke Island, Fort Macon on Bogue Banks, and Fort Fisher at Carolina Beach.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 4, Apr 1998, p38, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
3792
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reidsville's Chinqua-Penn Plantation is Rockingham County's main tourist attraction. Built in the 1920s by Betsy and Thomas Jefferson Penn, the 27-room mansion is a blend of gardens, architecture, and works of art.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 8, Aug 1998, p24-25, il
Record #:
3791
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once dependent on the textile and tobacco industries, Rocking ham County looks to diversification to improve its economy. Among the largest employers are Miller Brewing Co. (beer), and Burlington Industries (home fashions). Abundant educational opportunities are available, and two fine hospitals serve the county.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 8, Aug 1998, p21-22,26-27, il
Record #:
3940
Author(s):
Abstract:
Introduction of computers and automation into the textile industry has allowed it not only to survive but also thrive at home and in the international marketplace.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 11, Nov 1998, p48,50,52-57, il
Record #:
4056
Author(s):
Abstract:
Greensboro faces a water shortage and has put mandatory water conservation measures into effect. The shortage affects economic developer's ability to sell the city to potential businesses. Even those with small water needs of 75,000 gallons are being turned down. One source of relief is construction of the Randleman Dam, first proposed in 1937, which would create a 48 million gallon reservoir.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 1, Jan 1999, p40
Record #:
4130
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earl N. Phillips, Jr., chairman and CEO of GE Capital First Factors of High Point, is the new chairman of the North Carolina Citizens for Business and Industry (NCCBI) for 1999-2000. He graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1962 and later from Harvard Business School.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 4, Apr 1999, p40-42, por
Record #:
4305
Author(s):
Abstract:
For children desiring to sit in the driver's seat of a famous stock car or in the cockpit of a real airplane, the Greensboro Children's Museum is the place to go. The 45,000-square-foot museum, located downtown in a renovated car dealership, has attracted 40,000 visitors since its May 1999 opening. An outdoor exhibit/learning space is under construction, and long-range plans call for an Imax theater.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 9, Sept 1999, p8, il, por
Record #:
4329
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1881, French artist Paul Phillipoteaux painted the Battle of Gettysburg Cyclorama. It is the world's largest oil painting, measuring 376 feet long and 22 feet high. Wake Forest University now owns the painting and stores it in Clemmons, North Carolina. State Senator Ham Horton of Winston-Salem feels the painting would be a great tourist attraction and got $50,000 from the 1999 General Assembly to do a feasibility study on assembling the painting in suitable surroundings as a tourist attraction.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 10, Oct 1999, p8, il, por
Record #:
5017
Author(s):
Abstract:
Project Homestead has renovated or built 600 homes in Greensboro and another 150 in Reidsville, Goldsboro, and Kinston over the last ten years. Founded by Rev. Michael King, the project does more than just build homes for low-income families. It offers a Home Ownership Development Readiness class, which trains people to become homeowners.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 3, Mar 2001, p9, por
Record #:
6415
Author(s):
Abstract:
No major Civil War battles were fought in the North Carolina mountains; however, many mountain people did declare either for the North or the South, and evidence remains of the encounters that took placed there. Johnson recounts several of these, including stories of a Confederate Cherokee regiment led by a crazed white man, women bushwhackers who posed as men to join the army, and Union Captain Miles Keough, who captured the town of Boone and later died with Custer at the Little Big Horn.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p68-70, 72, 75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6728
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina refused to ratify the new Constitution in 1788, unless a list of rights for all citizens was added to it. To win over North Carolina and other states, James Madison sent twelve handwritten copies of the rights to the states; they were accepted. Today this list is known as the Bill of Rights. After the Civil War, the state's handwritten copy was stolen by a Union soldier and carried to Ohio. Johnson follows the document's trail from there until it was recovered in Philadelphia by the FBI in 2003.
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Record #:
7216
Author(s):
Abstract:
The stretch of U.S. Highway 129 starting at Cheoah Dam near Robbinsville in Graham County and ending at Tabcat Bridge in Tennessee is called the Tail of the Dragon. In this particular eleven-mile stretch, over 300 curves, steep grades, and tight turns test the driving abilities of motorists, motorcyclists, and bicyclists. The speed limit is 30 mph, although it used to be 55 mph on the North Carolina side of the road. Johnson describes the road and its attraction to cyclists.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p104-106, 108-109, il Periodical Website
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