NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Forests and forestry--Outer Banks
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4657
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Outer Banks's maritime forests, including Currituck Banks, Buxton Woods, and Zeke's Island, provide groundwater storage and refuge for wildlife. Climate changes from north to south account for the variety in vegetation with cabbage palmetto trees on the southern end and deciduous canopy trees on the northern. Protecting the forest is a joint effort of local, state, and federal agencies.
Source:
Record #:
6413
Author(s):
Abstract:
Adams describes the maritime forests of the Outer Banks, areas that shelter habitats ecologically rich and hauntingly beautiful. These forests are some of the finest and most accessible ones in the state. They are Currituck Banks, Kitty Hawk Woods, Nags Head Woods, Buxton Woods, Shackelford Banks, Theodore Roosevelt State Natural Area, and Bear Island. Buxton Woods is the largest of the group.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9791
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once maritime forests covered the Outer Banks, but now they have been reduced to small pockets protected by governmental and conservation organizations. Spence discusses their history and what scientific research reveals about them.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
6742
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nags Head Woods lies on the Outer Banks between Jockey's Ridge and the Wright Memorial. Beane says, \"Many ecologists have called the tract one of the best and most pristine examples of maritime forests remaining in the world. The approximately 1,400-acre system contains a variety of habitats and ecological communities.\" The woods is home to 300 species of plants, 150 species of birds, 22 mammal species, 28 reptiles, and 14 amphibians.
Source:
Full Text: