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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 16 Issue 1, May 1968
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Record #:
16450
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Abstract:
It is though by some folklore scholars that narrators of folk songs and folk tales sing their native songs and tell their traditional tales more enthusiastically and more vividly when they are dwelling in localities far distant and far different from their original habitat. Although the folk song and the folk tale have no natural boundaries and no linguistic barriers when it comes to their expansion and survival, they nevertheless undergo some changes when being translated from one language to another, and are affected, to some extent, by the forces and materials in a new environment whenever they are transplanted. This article relates animal tales told by African American students attending Livingstone College--tales possessing the qualities of geographical-spread, historical longevity, and group property status, and are authentic reflectors of folk life in a particular region.
Record #:
35283
Abstract:
Several sonnets, written by John Harvey with heavy Shakespearian influence, about a young woman are presented in this article. This is the earliest example of Shakespeare’s works being manifested in colonial America.
Record #:
35285
Abstract:
An excerpt from “A Narrative of the Life, Sufferings, and Escape of John Brown, a Fugitive Slave, now in England,” details the process of tobacco farming in North Carolina from a slave hand’s perspective.
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Record #:
35286
Abstract:
An area of rock outcropping in Warren County was said to be frequented by the devil; it had a footprint in the center, raised track marks, and is mysteriously cleared of smaller rocks each day.
Record #:
35281
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This is a transcribed conversation with Robert Frost, who told his companions about the first time he visited North Carolina.
Record #:
35282
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By using “the Wolf and the Fox in a Well” as a case study, the author analyzes the differences in story and style in its different variations.
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Record #:
35287
Abstract:
A brief introduction preludes the tune and lyrics for the ballad “What are Little Babies made of?”
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Record #:
35284
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A poem about how the emergence of yellow jackets foretold the beginning of farming season.
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Record #:
35290
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Abstract:
In Indian society, the importance of having a male child is reflected in both social and religious aspects. Spiritual attempts to bring forth a male child is portrayed by offerings to the gods, pilgrimages, sacrifices, and obedience to the family elders.
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Record #:
35292
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Abstract:
Based in humor from the southwest, “Some Adventures of Simon Suggs” became a famous literature about frontier life. Complete with illustrations and a short biography of the author of the novel, the similes found in the book are categorized by their comparisons.
Record #:
35289
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of proverbial sayings is long and vast, many of which belong to a set of poetic devices. The author has categorized some of these sayings under headings such as “identified old and familiar sayings,” “unidentified old and familiar sayings,” “humorous and cynical sayings,” and “metaphors and similes.”
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Record #:
35293
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The author lists ingredients commonly found in drugstores that were included in people’s home remedies. Along with the ingredient, Wilson lists what it was ailments it was used for.
Record #:
35291
Author(s):
Abstract:
Found in Appalachian areas and into the Midwest, there are only a few examples of “talking out fire,” in records, but the author aims to study this phenomenon of relieving the pain from burn victims.
Record #:
35294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Used in ceremonial or spiritual contexts, Yaupon was the main ingredient in what was known as the “black drought,” or black drink, in Native American societies.
Record #:
35288
Author(s):
Abstract:
Written by the author in 1878, the reasoning for crimson colored flowers and the roan color of the mountain is attributed to a Native American legend.